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Transcript

Articulating Cartillage

Articular cartilage serves as a smooth, protective layer that allows for frictionless movement between the bones. It acts as a cushion and reduces the impact on the joint during weight-bearing activities

Medial Collateral Ligament

It runs along the length of the inner aspect of the knee, connecting the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone). The MCL plays a crucial role in providing stability to the knee and resisting forces that push the knee from the outer sideThe primary function of the MCL is to stabilize the knee joint and prevent excessive movement from side to side. It resists forces that would push the knee outward, helping to protect the inner structures of the joint

While the tibia bears the majority of the body's weight, the fibula provides additional support and helps maintain the overall structure of the lower legThe fibula does not bear as much weight as the tibia and does not directly participate in the knee joint. It does, however, contribute to the stability of the ankle joint, where it articulates with the tibia and the talus bone of the foot

Fibula

Posterior Cruciate Ligament

The primary function of the PCL is to prevent the tibia from moving too far backward in relation to the femur. the ACL and PCL work together to provide stability to the knee joint, the PCL is particularly important for preventing posterior translation of the tibia. PCL injuries are less common than ACL injuries but can still lead to symptoms such as pain, swelling, and instability in the knee

The image on the left shows the tibia bone on the right(medial side) and the Fibula bone on the left(lateral side)Various muscles, ligaments, and tendons attach to the tibia, contributing to its stability and facilitating movement. The patellar ligament, for example, connects the patella (kneecap) to the tibial tuberosity, which is a bony prominence on the front of the tibia

Tibia

Lateral Cruciate Ligament

LCL connects the femur (thigh bone) to the fibula (one of the two lower leg bones). The primary function of the LCL is to resist forces that push the knee joint from the inside, helping to stabilize the outer aspect of the knee.

Lateral Cruciate LIgament

LCL connects the femur (thigh bone) to the fibula (one of the two lower leg bones). The primary function of the LCL is to resist forces that push the knee joint from the inside, helping to stabilize the outer aspect of the knee.

The femur is the largest and strongest bone in the human body, and it is located in the thigh. It extends from the hip joint to the knee joint and plays a central role in supporting body weightThe femur has a shaft and two expanded ends. The upper end of the femur forms the head, which articulates with the acetabulum of the hip bone to form the hip joint. The lower end forms the condyles, which articulate with the tibia and patella to form the knee joint.

Femur bone

Commonly known as the kneecap, is a small, flat, triangular-shaped bone located in the front of the knee joint. It protect the knee joint and enhance the leverage of the quadriceps muscles during activities like walking, running, and jumping.

Patella

There are two menisci in each knee, one on the inner (medial) side and one on the outer (lateral) side. The menisci are crescent-shaped wedges of fibrocartilage.The menisci act as shock absorbers and contribute to the stability of the knee joint. They help distribute the body's weight across the joint, reduce friction, and provide cushioning during movement

Menisci

The image on the left shows the tibia bone on the right(medial side) and the Fibula bone on the left(lateral side)Various muscles, ligaments, and tendons attach to the tibia, contributing to its stability and facilitating movement. The patellar ligament, for example, connects the patella (kneecap) to the tibial tuberosity, which is a bony prominence on the front of the tibia

Tibia

Fibula

While the tibia bears the majority of the body's weight, the fibula provides additional support and helps maintain the overall structure of the lower legThe fibula does not bear as much weight as the tibia and does not directly participate in the knee joint. It does, however, contribute to the stability of the ankle joint, where it articulates with the tibia and the talus bone of the foot

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)

A major ligaments in the knee joint. It is a strong, fibrous band of tissue that runs diagonally in the middle of the knee, connecting the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone)It provides stability to the knee joint by preventing excessive forward movement of the tibia in relation to the femur and controlling rotational movements

The femur is the largest and strongest bone in the human body, and it is located in the thigh. It extends from the hip joint to the knee joint and plays a central role in supporting body weightThe femur has a shaft and two expanded ends. The upper end of the femur forms the head, which articulates with the acetabulum of the hip bone to form the hip joint. The lower end forms the condyles, which articulate with the tibia and patella to form the knee joint.

Femur Bone