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Words and actions: Teaching languages through the lens of social justice

Chapter 1

Chapter 3

Chapter 2

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

index

Introduction

  1. What does social justice look like in the WL classroom?
  2. How can teachers establish an environment inclusive and supportive of social justice educatioin?
  3. Where do the Learning for Justice domains fit into my practice?

Chapter 1

marginalization
dehumanization (Freire, 1993)
multicultural education (Banks & McGee Banks, 2012)
privilege (Peggy McIntosh, 1989)
asset pedagogies*
oppression(Freire, 1993)
equality vs. equity

Concepts and Terminology related to social justice

- According to Nieto (2010) social justice “is a philosophy, an approach, and actions that embody treating all people with fairness, respect, dignity, and generosity” (p. 46). - Nieto (2010) suggests SJE has 4 components: (1) Challenges, confronts, and disrupts the status quo (2) It targets all students to provide them with tools of success (3) Draws on the talents and strengths of students (4) Promotion of critical thinking and student agency - Social justice is for ALL

What is social justice education?

Glynn, C., & Wassell, B. (2018). Who gets to play? Issues of access and social justice in world language study in the U.S.

  • Social justice must move beyond theory into actionable steps that students are able to develop, exhibit and execute to improve their own classroom environment and beyond
  • Learning to recognize bias and prejudices in the cultures being studied and the role power dynamics play in the cultures being studied as a way of analyzing one’s own culture.
    • Systems of oppression
    • Power (social, cultural, political, etc.)
    • Implicit biases
  • “All pedagogical efforts are infiltrated with value judgments and cross-hatched by vectors of power serving particular interests in the name of certain regimes of truth” (Sleeter & McLaren, 1995, p. 18).
    • There is no one way to be Mexican, Chinese, from the U.S., etc.
  • As a result, teachers must be aware of their own cultural biases, dominance and power (p. 6)
  • Comparing and contrasting cultures through respectful curiosity
    • Focus on empathy, respect, understanding, and connection
Four domains of social justice education
Formerly "Teaching for Tolerance"

learning for justice

ACTION

JUSTICE

DIVERSITY

  • Using culture as a means of exploring the identities of the culture being studied and one’s own culture
    • This requires moving beyond vocabulary-focused work (clothing, food, etc.)
  • Critical thinking about one’s own cultural identity by exploring the cultures in the TL
    • Which identities are dominant? How? Why?
  • Remember, students are not “passive recipients of an immutable culture” (González, 2005, p. 36).

IDENTITY

According to ACTFL (2014), global competence is the “ability to communicate with respect and cultural understanding in more than one language” (p. 5)

What’s missing from these definitions?

What is global competence?

Byram (2000) describes intercultural communicative competence as one’s ability to see connections between 2 or more cultures and navigate them.

  • How do you see the 5 Cs aligning and promoting opportunities for teaching social justice in WLE?
  • What constitutes SJE? Look at p. 10.
    • Most often missed are:
      • Tools for critical analysis
      • Tools for social change
      • Tools for action
    • Why do you think this is the case?

a couple of questions . . .

Vocabulary

The 5 Cs

discussion

When is a vocabulary list more than a vocabulary list? How does that list teach students more than just words? Does it situate you or your student in a particular social class? How could the choices one makes about vocabulary contribute to or reinforce stereotypes, values, or assumptions related to social class, race, gender, etc.?

Which of the World-Readiness Standards (5 Cs) do you think are the most relevant to address in lessons that also address social justice issues?

Preparing to Teach for Social Justice

Chapter 2

  1. What is my teacher identity and frame of reference?
  2. How can I center students in the WL classroom?
  3. What pieces should be considered when creating classroom community?
Things to think about:
  • frame of reference ≠ identity
  • Each person enters a space with their own lived experiences and intersectionalities.
  • Understanding our own biases and tendencies towards certain prejudices
  • Being cognizant of the apprenticeship of observation
Activity:
  • Circles of My Multicultural Self (www.edchange.org)
    • HOW/WHEN/WHY should you use something like this with your students?

Who are you as a teacher?

CSP
CRP

Ensure that All Students are Represented

CRT

Students' Backgrounds & Abilities

Drawing on Students' Assets

P of the O

centering STudents

Be a facilitator, AND actively engage the students.

Be okay with SILENCE.

Be courageous and challenge students with topics and actions.

Capitalize on your students' unique perspectives.

Create a discourse community that encourages discussion.

Creating a such a space involves thinking carefully about the specific teacher practices you engage in (what you do as a teacher during the lesson) and the dispositions you embody toward your learners (your attitudes, beliefs, and how they manifest in your actions).

Building learning communities that bridge differences

Privilege

Circles of my Multicultral Self

discussion

Thinking of Peggy McIntosh's definition of privilege, in what way do you believe that you have benefited from unearned privilege, or in what way have you experienced marginalization? How might these experiences influence the way in which you view learning and teaching?

With your circles in mind, think about and identify the topics of SJ with which you most struggle. Why do you think these would be hardest? How is the difficulty of these topics connected to aspects of your identity and your frames of reference?

Creating Orginal Social Justice Units

Chapter 3

  1. Where does planning a unit start?
  2. What is backward design?
  3. How do proficiency tasks fit into the overarching unit plan?

theme

"Envision this theem as an umbrella under which all other pieces of the unit will fit, yet it should be narrow enough to allow students to examine 'fewer topics in depth rather than many topics superficially,' one main benefit of creating a thematic unit" (Clementi & Terrill, 2017 as cited in Glynn et al., 2018, p. 32-33)."Thematic units also lead to more meaningful learning, as language learning remains more contextualized in a thematic unity" (Curtain & Dahlberg, 2016; Shrum & Glisan, 2016; as cited in Glynn et al., 2018, p. 33)."Finally, Curtain & Dahlberg (2016) point out, "Thematic planning changes the instructional focus from the language itself to the use of language to achieve meaningful goals," and instruction designed around a theme leads to "complex thinking and more sophisticated use of langauge" (p. 39, as cited in Glynn et al., 2018, p. 33).

  • It provides you with an overarching idea (foundation) from which to build out your lessons
  • It gives you a "big picture" view, which will allow you to drill down to smaller and smaller chunks (assessments-lessons-activities).
  • It allows you to make changes and modify instruction, strategies, and assessments in advance.

What's in a

Step 5: Plan learning activities and formative assessmentsStep 6: Write your daily lesson plans

Step 3: Create an authentic summative assessmentStep 4: Incorporate formative assessment into learning activities

Step 1: Identify theme, essential question(s), and takeaway understanding(s)Step 2: Unpack goals and standards

3Plan learning experiences and instruction
2Determine acceptable evidence
1Identify desired results

using backward design

Designing your unit plan

from the text

Sample unit frames

Further details in Google Drive
based on proficiency based curriculum

Personal samples

Sample IPA Template

Simplified Template for Intercultural Unit

Blank Template for Intercultural Unit

Español
Français
中文

Some language specific examples

Adapting Existing Curricula for Social Justice

  1. Why should one adapt/modify existing curriculum for SJE?
  2. Where do you begin?
  3. How can one innovate existing curriculum and textbooks to include a SJE perspective?

Chapter 4

What type of assessments are there?What is there focus?

Focus & Function

ASSESSMENTS

What are the majority of the activities focused on?What types of activities are there in the textbook?

Types & Focus

ACTIVITIES

What cultural informaiton is provided? How is culture handled?Where is it placed in the textbook?

Cultural Blurbs & Lessons

CULTURE

What's the focus of the EQs and Can-Do statements?

Focus & Function

EQs & Can-Dos

What are the themes? Are they interconnected or siloed? Where are they going?

Scope & Sequence

THEME

innovating existing curriculum to include sje

Planning Daily Lessons

  1. How should daily lesson plans be structured?
  2. How do I make sure they relate back to the overall learning goals/targets and the unit theme?

Chapter 5

  1. Select the standards to be prioritized in the lesson
  2. Select the objectives to be prioritized in the lesson
  3. Create or identify formative assessments
  4. Brainstorm lesson activities
  5. Sequence your lesson activities
    1. gain attention/activate prior knowledge
    2. provide input
    3. elicit performance/provide feedback
    4. provide input
    5. elicit performance/provide feedback
    6. closure
    7. enhance retention and transer

Steps to an effective, useful lesson plan

Step 2(b)
Step 2(a)
Steps 1 - 5

Figure 5.1. A flowchart for planning

Creating daily lesson plans

  • using a blank sheet of paper for a computer screen;
  • a list of the key langauge (vocab & function) students will need to succeed in your unit;
  • the work you did in Steps 2 (Objectives) and 3 (Formative Assessments) in plotting out each day of your unit plan; and
  • the list of the categories of social justice activities provided in Ch. 1 & Appendix A (of this text)
    • Which modes of communication (interpretive, interpersonal, presentational, intercultural) are students using? Is there variety?
    • What types of authentic resources are being used? How can they be used?
    • What and which cultural components (products, practices, perspectives) are you teaching? Is there variety?
    • Which models of classroom organization are used? Is there variety?
Step 4
Step 3

Creating daily lesson plans

  • Teachers "preview" an objective with students using inductive activities so that students get a "sneak peak" at the topic and resources for processing
  • During the "view" stage, students are given direct instruction where all components are made explicit
  • In the "review" stage, students put their knowledge into practice
Preview-view-review structure
  • gain attention/activate prior knowledge
  • provide input
  • elicit performance/provide feedback
  • provide input
  • elicit performance/provide feedback
  • closure
  • enhance retention and transer
Appendix K - Clementi & Terrill's (2017) The Keys to Planning for Learning: Effective Curriculum, Unit, and Lesson Design
Sequencing structures:
versus
Step 5

Creating daily lesson plans

sample lesson plan templates

  1. Although Li and his colleagues chose a social justice understanding related to identify for their "All about me" unit, the team could have incorporated others. Think of at least one additional understanding that would appropriate for this unit for your target language structure.
  2. What would you suggest to a colleague who told you she or he did not belive in writing lesson plans? What arguments could you make in support of planning, particularly for someone just beginning to incorporate social justice into their teaching?
  3. How might you collaborate with others to address social justice issues into your planning if you were the only world langauge teacher in your school building? What would collaboration look and sound like in this situation?
  4. Think of a time when something you were taught in a world langauge class was meaningful to you. How did you learn it? Why was it meaningful?
  5. Appendix A includes sample activities and resrouces for various themes. Choose one activity and differentiate it for a class geared toward the novice-mid proficiency level. Then differentiate for intermediate-low students. Finally, differentiate for group of heritage language learners.

Discussion

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03

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summary

Conclusions

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Bibliography

References

questions?

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THANKYOU

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