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Transcript

Welcome to Projects on a Page, a national scheme of work for primary design and technology (D&T).The scheme comprises of Project Planners designed to help primary schools in England implement the NationalCurriculum for D&T in an imaginative way. Based on universal principles of effective teaching and learning in D&T, it will also be a valuable resource for schools in other parts of the UK and further afield.

Click on each of the images for more information...

The programmes of study set out only the essential, core knowledge, understanding and skills. To promote best practice in schools, Projects on a Page includes some important, additional elements which are not in the statutory requirements (e.g. planning the sequence in which products are made).

KS1

Lower KS2

Upper KS2

CLICK HERE FOR PDF VERSION

Food Preparing fruit and vegetables

MechanismsSliders and levers

Textiles Templates and joining

MechanismsWheels and axles

Food Preparing fruit and vegetables

StructuresFreestanding structures

StructuresShell Structures

MechanismsLevers and linkages

Textiles 2D shape to 3D product

ElectricalSimple circuits and switches

StructuresShell Structures CAD

MechanismsPneumatics

ElectricalSimple programming and control

ElectricalMore complex switches

FoodCelebrating culture and seasonality

Mechanisms Cams

StructuresFrame Structures

StructuresComputer Aided

MechanismsPulleys and Gears

Textiles Combining Different Fabric Shapes

TextilesUsing CAD in textiles

FoodHealthy and varied diet

Electrical Monitoring and control

InspirationKey Events and Individuals

Preparing Fruit and Vegetables

Return

designtechnology.org.uk

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Negotiating, developing and agreeing a plan of action, evaluating actions

Hygiene - Key Points

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Jewellery is removed Hair is tied back Sleeves are rolled up Aprons are on Hands are washed Cuts are covered with bluewaterproof dressing

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Discussing and comparing different effects.

How Will i process my fruit?

info

What sort of Fruit Product should I make?

USING DIFFERENT TOOLS AND PRACTISING USING DIFFERENT FOOD PROCESSING SKILLS

Talking, drawing, writinglists, generating design criteria

Designing, making and evaluating a fruit snack for a class picnic...

Peeling

grating

Cutting

slicing

squeezing

DOWNLOAD PDF

Glossary

UTENSIL

FOOD

EFFECT

mouth feel

Makes Juice

Unpeeled Apple

Thin Rings

Tips for Teachers

To foster children's engagement in discussions, design, and food product creation, showcase a variety of fruits through captivating photographs, accompanied by relevant technical terms. Facilitate learning by having children categorize fruits and vegetables, employing visual aids like photo cards. Incorporate unfamiliar fruits to broaden their knowledge. Use food-related stories and poems to inspire and introduce the project. Enhance real-world context by arranging a visit to a local store or food market. For hands-on exploration, consider using budget-friendly carrots to experiment with diverse equipment like graters and serrated knives with rounded ends.

Useful Resources

• Caribbean fruit cocktails (7-9 years but contains useful information)• Are you teaching food in Primary D&T?• Super salads (7-9 years but contains useful info)• Fantastic fruitOther useful web-based resources:• www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

How will different food processes create different effects?

What tools and food processing skills will i use?

• Fruit – plant or tree’s edible seed with envelope. • Vegetable – plant used for food. • Nutrients – all the things in food that the body needs to remain healthy. • Pith – the soft white lining inside fruit such as oranges. • Salad – a cold dish of fresh and/or cooked vegetables or fruit. • Sensory evaluation – subjective testing of foods where senses are used to evaluate qualities such as appearance, smell, taste, texture (mouth feel). •Kebab – cooked and/or fresh ingredients on a skewer.

do i need to adjust or change anything?

will my fruit salad meet the needs of the user?

Years 1/2

Click here for Page 2

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Thought

Action

Juicer

Peeler

Knife

Apple

Carrot

Orange

Preparing Fruit and Vegetables

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3. Key learning in design and technology

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1. Year GroupsYears 1/2

2. Aspects of D&T Food

FocusPreparing fruit and vegetables

4. What could children design, make and evaluate?

5. Intended users

6. Purpose of products

7. Links to topics and themes

8. Possible contexts

9. Project title

10. Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs)

11. Related learning in other subjects

12. Focused Tasks (FTs)

13. Related learning in other subjects

designtechnology.org.uk

14. Design, make and evaluate (DMEA)

15. Related learning in other subjects

Design, make and evaluate a _______ (product) for _________ (user) for __________ (purpose) To be completed by the teacher. Use the project title to set the scene for children’s learning prior to activities in 10, 12 and 14.

16. Possible resources

17. Key vocabulary

18. Key competencies

19. Health and safety

20. Overall potential of project

Return to Page One

Return to Home Page

Mechanisms - Sliders and Levers

1

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+

2

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3

Evaluating the final product against design criteria, when retelling the fairy tale

Modifying, adapting and improving

4

Creating moving pictures for each scene of the fairy tale

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Trying out and evaluating ideas for mechanisms and pictures using inexpensive card and paper

Designing, making and evaluating a moving storyboard to retell a fairy tale to the class

WHAT WILL BE IN EACH SCENE?

info

Who is the storyboard for?

Developing and communicating ideas through talk

USING TALK TO GENERATE INITIAL IDEAS

Glossary

Should we use a lever or a slider for each scene?

Tips for Teachers

Useful Resources

• Moving Pictures • Working with sliders and levers • Levers and linkages - Poster and Support Pack • Mechanisms with a message

Am I working on my own or with others?

How well am I doing? Are the mechanisms working in the storyboard?

Evaluating, reflecting, questioning

More thoughts…

DOWNLOAD PDF

Years 1/2

Click here for page 2

Simple mechanisms move...

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SEE ALL RESOURCES

Children can delve into the world of simple mechanisms by exploring sliders and levers using books and prepared examples. They craft these mechanisms using pre-cut card strips, learning to create pivots with a pencil and construct guides with masking tape. Technical vocabulary is displayed, and children are encouraged to incorporate it into discussions and design. The activity links theoretical learning to real-world applications, emphasising the presence of these mechanisms in everyday items like door handles. The interactive nature involves children directly operating mechanisms, enhancing understanding. Directional language distinctions are introduced, and extra support is provided for attaching paper fasteners to levers. This comprehensive approach ensures an engaging and educational exploration of simple mechanisms.

Mechanism – a device used to create movement in a product.Lever – a rigid bar which moves around a pivot. Levers are used in many everyday products. In this project children will use card strips for levers and paper fasteners for pivots.Slider – a rigid bar which moves backwards and forwards along a straight line. Unlike a lever, a slider does not have a pivot point.Slot – the hole through which a lever or slider is placed to enable part of a picture to move.Guide or bridge – a short card strip used to keep sliders in place and control movement.

designtechnology.org.uk

Thought

Action

Improves communication on any topic.

Connects with your audience...

And makes them a part of the message.

90% of the information we assimilate comes to us through sight. Tell stories with graphics!

4

3

2

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3. Key learning in design and technology

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1. Year GroupsYears 1/2

2. Aspect of D&T Mechanisms

FocusPreparing fruit and vegetables

4. What could children design, make and evaluate?

5. Intended users

6. Purpose of products

7. Links to topics and themes

8. Possible contexts

9. Project title

10. Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs)

11. Related learning in other subjects

12. Focused Tasks (FTs)

13. Related learning in other subjects

designtechnology.org.uk

14. Design, make and evaluate (DMEA)

15. Related learning in other subjects

Design, make and evaluate a _______ (product) for _________ (user) for __________ (purpose) To be completed by the teacher. Use the project title to set the scene for children’s learning prior to activities in 10, 12 and 14.

16. Possible resources

17. Key vocabulary

18. Key competencies

19. Health and safety

20. Overall potential of project

Return to Page One

Return to Home Page

Mechanisms - Sliders and Levers

Electrical Systems - Simple Circuits and Switches

designtechnology.org.uk

Return

Evaluating the nightlight with the intended user and against design criteria.

More actions… assembling, testing and modifying.

Designing, making and evaluating a night light for a brother, sister or friend

Negotiating, developing and agreeing a plan of action.

Connecting block

Microcontrollers

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wrap ends around

When children are familiar with using electrical circuits they should be introduced to microcontrollers. Products such as a micro:bit has in-built inputs and outputs and children can program them to follow instructions and create interesting and useful effects in their products.

Bisc Bulb Holder

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Twist strands of wire

Discussing, exploring and trialling materials.

What switch will work best for my night light?

tape over with insulating tape

info

What sort of night light shall I make and who will it be for?

Discussing ideas, modeling possible electrical circuits.

Discussing ideas, drawing annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams.

DOWNLOAD

Glossary

Tips for Teachers

Undertake this project around the same time or soon after covering electricity in science. Enhance the investigation by incorporating images of existing battery-powered products. Prioritize checking battery conditions and emphasizing secure connections. Model the fault-finding process to reduce help requests, ensuring tight connections and correct component placements. Set up a 'working' circuit for testing suspect components. Pay attention to the correct orientation of components like buzzers and match bulbs and batteries. Use non-rechargeable zinc carbon and zinc chloride batteries for safety, avoiding lithium or alkaline batteries that can overheat. Button batteries are not recommended for younger children.

Useful Resources

• Torches, Lamps and Lanterns • Developing Handmade Switches • Night lights (links to Literacy) • Handmade Switches Helpsheet • Alarming Vehicles

How will I make the base, casing and shade?

Who will I work with? How long will it take?

• Circuit – path through which electricity passes. • Conductor – a material which allows an electric current to pass through it. • Insulator – a material which does not easily allow electric current to pass through it.• Prototype – a model made to test whether a design will work. • Push-to-break switch – a switch turned off by pressing it. • Push-to-make switch – a switch turned on by pressing it. • Reed switch – a switch operated by a magnet. • Toggle switch – a switch operated when a lever is pressed. • System – a set of related parts or components that together achieve a desired outcome.• Output devices – components that produce an outcome e.g. bulbs and buzzers. • Input devices – components that are used to control an electrical circuit e.g. switches.

More thoughts… appraising, reflecting, refining.

Will the night light meet the needs of the user and achieve its purpose?

Years 1/2

Instant CPD

SEE ALL RESOURCES

making secure connections

Wire

Wire

Paperclip

Wire

Paper fasteners

Paper fasteners

Loop wire around paper fasteners

Foil on inside surfaces

Card

Thought

Action

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3. Key learning in design and technology

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1. Year GroupsYears 1/2

2. Aspects of D&T Electrical Systems

FocusSimple Circuits and Switches

4. What could children design, make and evaluate?

5. Intended users

6. Purpose of products

7. Links to topics and themes

8. Possible contexts

9. Project title

10. Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs)

11. Related learning in other subjects

12. Focused Tasks (FTs)

13. Related learning in other subjects

designtechnology.org.uk

14. Design, make and evaluate (DMEA)

15. Related learning in other subjects

Design, make and evaluate a _______ (product) for _________ (user) for __________ (purpose) To be completed by the teacher. Use the project title to set the scene for children’s learning prior to activities in 10, 12 and 14.

16. Possible resources

17. Key vocabulary

18. Key competencies

19. Health and safety

20. Overall potential of project

Return to Page One

Return to Home Page

Electrical Systems - Simple Circuits and Switches

Textiles - 2D Shape to 3D Product

Return

designtechnology.org.uk

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Negotiating, developing and agreeing a plan of action, evaluating actions

Read More

Read More

Discussing and comparing different effects.

What shape will the holder be? How will it fasten?

info

Who is it for? What will it hold?

Generate design criteria Investigate a range of templates/patterns

Discuss ideas; create a list of likes and dislikes of the user

Designing, making and evaluating a holder/purse/wallet for a friend or relative

Back stitch

blanket stitch

backwards running stitch

over sew stitch

running stitch

DOWNLOAD PDF

Glossary

Tips for Teachers

In the creative learning environment, it's essential to cater to the diverse needs of children. For those who may struggle with creating their own patterns, provide simple templates to ignite their creativity. Demonstrate stitching techniques and offer help sheets with clear instructions, allowing children to practice stitching independently. To foster a collaborative spirit, organize small group sewing sessions with the assistance of adult helpers, possibly implementing a rotation of activities for a dynamic experience. Guide the children through finishing techniques on small fabric pieces and introduce a limited range of fasteners to enhance their skills. Embrace sustainability by using recycled fabrics, such as old clothing, making sure they are easy for young hands to work with. For prototypes, consider materials like dipryl or J-cloth. Encourage exploration by showcasing a variety of products and images, including at least one item that can be disassembled to reveal its parts.

Useful Resources

• Aprons • Designing with textiles • Bendy bags (Years 1/2) • A to Z of D&T • Working with Materials

How will different food processes create different effects?

What tools and food processing skills will i use?

• Appliqué – means ‘applied’ - describes method of stitching/gluing patches onto fabric (originally to mend holes in worn clothes) to provide decoration. • Pattern/Template – a shape drawn to exact shape and size and used to assist cutting out. • Seam – a line of stitching that joins pieces of fabrics together. • Seam Allowance – extra fabric allowed for joining together - usually 1.5cm. • Prototype – a model that is made to test whether a design will work. • Aesthetics – the way in which the product looks with the nature and expression

do i need to adjust or change anything?

will my fruit salad meet the needs of the user?

Years 3/4

Click here for Page 2

SEE ALL RESOURCES

Thought

Action

Cutting out techniques

Possible fastenings

Decorative Techniques

Applique by gluing or stitching

To move children’s learning on, as enhancement activities, children could research into different types of fabrics and how they are constructed. They could carry out tests to check e.g. strength, waterproofness or flexibility to ensure their chosen fabric can be used to create a product that meets the needs of user and is fit for purpose.

Bonded

Woven

Knitted

Felted

Buttons

Velcro

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3. Key learning in design and technology

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1. Year GroupsYears 1/2

2. Aspects of D&TTextilea

Focus2D Shape to 3D Product

4. What could children design, make & evaluate?

5. Intended users

6. Purpose of products

7. Links to topics and themes

8. Possible contexts

9. Project title

10. Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs)

11. Related learning in other subjects

12. Focused Tasks (FTs)

13. Related learning in other subjects

designtechnology.org.uk

14. Design, make and evaluate (DMEA)

15. Related learning in other subjects

Design, make and evaluate a _______ (product) for _________ (user) for __________ (purpose) To be completed by the teacher. Use the project title to set the scene for children’s learning prior to activities in 10, 12 and 14.

16. Possible resources

17. Key vocabulary

18. Key competencies

19. Health and safety

20. Overall potential of project

Return to Page One

Return to Home Page

Textiles - 2D Shape to 3D Product

Structures - Frame Structures using CAD

designtechnology.org.uk

Return

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Negotiating, developing and agreeing a plan of action, evaluating actions

Read More

Read More

Discussing and comparing different effects.

How Will i process my fruit?

Designing, making and evaluating CAD structures to design a vehicle for a toy

info

What is the purpose of the product?

USING DIFFERENT TOOLS AND PRACTISING USING DIFFERENT FOOD PROCESSING SKILLS

Investigating structures, discussing and researching ideas

DOWNLOAD PDF

Glossary

Tips for Teachers

In the creative learning environment, it's essential to cater to the diverse needs of children. For those who may struggle with creating their own patterns, provide simple templates to ignite their creativity. Demonstrate stitching techniques and offer help sheets with clear instructions, allowing children to practice stitching independently. To foster a collaborative spirit, organize small group sewing sessions with the assistance of adult helpers, possibly implementing a rotation of activities for a dynamic experience. Guide the children through finishing techniques on small fabric pieces and introduce a limited range of fasteners to enhance their skills. Embrace sustainability by using recycled fabrics, such as old clothing, making sure they are easy for young hands to work with. Encourage exploration by showcasing a variety of products and images, including at least one item that can be disassembled to reveal its parts.

Useful Resources

• Primary Subject Leaders’ File Section 5.9 • TinkerCAD Introduction • TinkerCAD Frame structures • TinkerCAD Simulation • TinkerCAD 3D Printing • E-Learning course - how to implement structures in the primary D&T curriculum • Bird Hide Design and Make Challenge

How will different food processes create different effects?

What tools and food processing skills will i use?

• CAD – computer-aided design. • Frame structure – a structure made from thin components such as a tent. • Handle – a point on a 3D object that can be grabbed to move or resize it. • Dimension – the sizes of objects or components. • Workplane – the flat surface for constructing CAD models. • Triangulation – using triangular supports to make a frame stronger. • Compression – the squashing force acting on an object or structure. • Tension – the stretching force acting on an object or structure. • CAM – Computer Aided Manufacture, machines linked to CAD software.

do i need to adjust or change anything?

will my fruit salad meet the needs of the user?

Years 3/4

Thought

Action

Join elements together to build up frame structures.

Drag and drop primitive shapes into the Workspace to start building your structure.

Click here for Page 2

SEE ALL RESOURCES

This is the workspace where you will build your creations.

Explore and use the different workspaces that can convert your creations into LEGO or Minecraft. Use simulation to test out your structures.

When to use CAD When children understand the value of using it to improve the accuracy and appearance of their products.Where it achieves learning objectives more efficiently.Where children have been taught and practised the necessary computing skills.Wherever possible, to design the functional and aesthetic features of a product.

When not to use CAD When children do not have sufficient understanding of the product they are designing.As a substitute for practical activities with actual materials and components.When a project can be delivered as effectively without it.When taking a CAD approach would be take longer or be less effective than making physical outcomes.

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3. Key learning in design and technology

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1. Year GroupsYears 1/2

2. Aspects of D&TStructures

FocusFrame Structures using CAD

4. What could children design, make and evaluate?

5. Intended users

6. Purpose of products

7. Links to topics and themes

8. Possible contexts

9. Project title

10. Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs)

11. Related learning in other subjects

12. Focused Tasks (FTs)

13. Related learning in other subjects

designtechnology.org.uk

14. Design, make and evaluate (DMEA)

15. Related learning in other subjects

Design, make and evaluate a _______ (product) for _________ (user) for __________ (purpose) To be completed by the teacher. Use the project title to set the scene for children’s learning prior to activities in 10, 12 and 14.

16. Possible resources

17. Key vocabulary

18. Key competencies

19. Health and safety

20. Overall potential of project

Return to Page One

Return to Home Page

Structures - Frame Structures using CAD

Food - Celebrating Culture and Seasonality

designtechnology.org.uk

Return

Designing, making and evaluating a yeast-based snack for parents and children participating in the schools sports day

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Discussing and comparing different effects.

Negotiating, developing and agreeing a plan of action, evaluating actions

DOWNLOAD PDF

Glossary

Read More

Tips for Teachers

Useful Resources

How will different food processes create different effects?

What tools and food processing skills will i use?

• Finishing – related to the appearance of the product – shape, decoration and colour. • Rubbing in – rubbing the dry ingredients together with the fat, lifting to put air into the mixture, so that it resembles fine breadcrumbs. • Knead – pulling and squeezing dough to make it smooth. • Bran – the hard, protective shell of a grain of wheat. • Dough – a mixture of flour, yeast and water before it is cooked. • Endosperm – the store of food inside a seed. • Germ – part of the seed where the root and shoots grow from. • Yeast – a tiny plant which makes bubbles of carbon dioxide when mixed with flour and warm water. • Unleavened bread – flat bread

Discussing and comparing different effects.

do i need to adjust or change anything?

will my fruit salad meet the needs of the user?

Years 5/6

info

Thought

Action

Possible Products

Possible techniques that children could use...

savoury scones

Mixing to combine ingredients if making savoury muffins or scones

Rubbing in to mix fat and flour if making a yeast-based product

Kneading a bread dough

Sensory Evaluation

When carrying out sensory evaluations of products and/or separate ingredients, begin with a whole class activity then use group work to develop ideas. Example of a recording table:

When adhering to design specifications in culinary activities, teachers can offer valuable tips to enhance the learning experience. When blending flour and fat, it's advised to maintain a cool environment for both ingredients and hands. Kneading bread serves the purpose of strengthening gluten, a protein found in grains like wheat; this process typically takes 10-12 minutes by hand, resulting in smooth, elastic dough. For product development, such as soup-making involving chopping and slicing, referencing the Y3/4 Food Project Planner is recommended. Teachers should encourage precise weighing and measuring while limiting additional ingredients to the basic recipe. Utilizing supermarkets and bakeries for class visits can be linked to enterprise projects, fostering real-world connections. Further interdisciplinary opportunities arise as children design packaging for their food products, integrating structural concepts tied to mathematics.

• Christmas Ginger Biscuits• Willy Wonka’s Fair Trade Cookies• Making Bread using the Six Essentials• Are you Teaching Food in Primary D&T?• A to Z of D&T• Make it Safe!Other useful web-based resources:www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

DISCUSSING IDEAS, RESEARCHING EXISTING PRODUCTS, DRAWING...

WHO AM I MAKING THE SNACK FOR? WHAT IS IT FOR?

biscuits

Click here for Page 2

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savoury muffins

RECORDING TABLE

WHERE WILL THE SNACK BE SERVED / EATEN?

DISCUSSING IDEAS AND HOW THE TYPE OF SNACK AND WAY IT IS EATEN WILL AFFECT DESIGN

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3. Key learning in design and technology

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1. Year GroupsYears 5/6

2. Aspects of D&TFood

FocusCelebrating culture and seasonality

4. What could children design, make and evaluate?

5. Intended users

6. Purpose of products

7. Links to topics and themes

8. Possible contexts

9. Project title

10. Investigative and Evaluative Activities (IEAs)

11. Related learning in other subjects

12. Focused Tasks (FTs)

13. Related learning in other subjects

designtechnology.org.uk

14. Design, make and evaluate (DMEA)

15. Related learning in other subjects

Design, make and evaluate a _______ (product) for _________ (user) for __________ (purpose) To be completed by the teacher. Use the project title to set the scene for children’s learning prior to activities in 10, 12 and 14.

16. Possible resources

17. Key vocabulary

18. Key competencies

19. Health and safety

20. Overall potential of project

Return to Page One

Return to Home Page

Food - Celebrating Culture and Seasonality

Welcome to Projects on a Page, a national scheme of work for primary design and technology (D&T).The scheme comprises of Project Planners designed to help primary schools in England implement the NationalCurriculum for D&T in an imaginative way. Based on universal principles of effective teaching and learning in D&T, it will also be a valuable resource for schools in other parts of the UK and further afield.

Click on each of the images for more information.

Textiles

The programmes of study set out only the essential, core knowledge, understanding and skills. To promote best practice in schools, Projects on a Page includes some important, additional elements which are not in the statutory requirements (e.g. planning the sequence in which products are made).

KS1

Lower KS2

Mechanisms

Upper KS2

Structures

Mechanisms

Electrical

Food

CLICK HERE FOR PDF VERSION

Food Preparing fruit and vegetables

Food Preparing fruit and vegetables

StructuresFreestanding structures

MechanismsSliders and levers

Textiles Templates and joining

MechanismsWheels and axles

KS1

Lower KS2

Food Healthy and varied diet

StructuresShell Structures

MechanismsLevers and linkages

Textiles 2D shape to 3D product

ElectricalSimple circuits and switches

Click on each of the images for more information.

Click on each of the images for more information.

Click on each of the images for more information.

Click on each of the buttons below to discover more...

StructuresShell Structures CAD

MechanismsPneumatics

Textiles Templates and joining

ElectricalSimple programming and control

UpperKS2

Food Healthy and varied diet

StructuresShell Structures

MechanismsLevers and linkages

Textiles 2D shape to 3D product

ElectricalSimple circuits and switches

StructuresShell Structures CAD

MechanismsPneumatics

Textiles Templates and joining

ElectricalSimple programming and control

read more

read more

Welcome to Projects on a Page, a national scheme of work for primary design and technology (D&T).The scheme comprises of Project Planners designed to help primary schools in England implement the NationalCurriculum for D&T in an imaginative way. Based on universal principles of effective teaching and learning in D&T, it will also be a valuable resource for schools in other parts of the UK and further afield.

Click on each of the images for more information.

Food

Food

The programmes of study set out only the essential, core knowledge, understanding and skills. To promote best practice in schools, Projects on a Page includes some important, additional elements which are not in the statutory requirements (e.g. planning the sequence in which products are made).

KS1

Lower KS2

Upper KS2

Structures

Structures

Textiles

Textiles

Mechanisms

Mechanisms

Electrical

Electrical

Food

Structures

Textiles

Mechanisms

Electrical

CLICK HERE FOR PDF VERSION

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Plan of action

  • Choose a Recipe
  • Introduction and Discussion
  • Ingredients and Equipment List
  • Group Work
  • Safety Rules
  • Step-by-Step Plan
  • Visual Aids
  • Recipe Testing
  • Discuss Modifications
  • Timeline and Schedule
  • Preparation Day
  • Cooking and Assembly
  • Taste Testing and Evaluation
  • Reflection and Discussion
  • Documentation
  • Sharing and Celebration

Where children have a particularly goodunderstanding of levers and sliders inKey Stage 1, they could be introduced tothe simplest lever and linkage mechanismused in Key Stage 2. This will introducethem to the idea of loose and fixed pivots.

Loose and Fixed Pivots

Add Moving Image

Idea Generation

Engage in brainstorming sessions to generate creative and innovative ideas. Encourage open communication and collaboration among team members. Conduct market research to understand current trends and available products.Analyze customer reviews and feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses in existing products. Drawing Annotated Sketches: Translate conceptual ideas into visual representations through hand-drawn sketches. Annotate sketches with detailed notes to convey specific design elements and functionalities. Generating a Simple Design Specification: Develop a concise design specification outlining key features and requirements. Clearly define the purpose, target audience, and desired user experience of the product. Prototyping: Create prototypes to test and validate design concepts. Gather feedback from stakeholders and iterate on the design based on testing results. Collaboration and Communication: Foster effective communication within the design team and with relevant stakeholders. Encourage collaboration to leverage diverse perspectives and expertise. Usability Testing: Conduct usability tests to evaluate the product's functionality and user interface. Gather feedback from end-users to identify areas for improvement. Iterative Design Process: Embrace an iterative design process, allowing for continuous refinement based on feedback. Be open to making adjustments and enhancements throughout the design lifecycle.

Use engaging and hands-on activities, such as simple programmable robots or interactive games, to demonstrate the basic principles. Emphasise the fun aspect, framing it as a way for children to make things move, light up, or even play music through simple coding. Keep instructions clear, use visual aids, and encourage teamwork to make the learning process enjoyable and collaborative. Remember to celebrate small achievements, fostering a positive attitude toward technology from an early age.

Microcontrollers

Idea Generation

  • Brainstorming
  • Talking
  • Drawing
  • Generating Design
  • Picture Prompts
  • Class Discussions
  • Creative Writing
  • Guest Speakers
  • School trips
  • Video prompts

Resources

• range of fresh fruit and vegetables• chopping boards, knives, peelers, graters, skewers,juicers, spoons, jugs, plates, bowls, aprons, plastictable covers, whisks, hand washing and washing-up facilities• yogurt making machine or blender, if appropriate

  • Relationship between pupil's ideas and communication
  • Clarification through activity
  • Example of iterative design and make process for an individual pupil during the project

An iterative process is the relationship between a pupil’s ideas and how they are communicated and clarified through activity. This is an example of how the iterative design and make process might be experienced by an individual pupil during this project. The iterative process in primary teaching encourages active learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. It recognizes that learning is not a linear path, but rather a dynamic and evolving journey. This approach also helps students develop resilience, as they learn to embrace challenges, learn from their mistakes, and persistently work towards improvement.

Iterative Process

  • Relationship between pupil's ideas and communication
  • Clarification through activity
  • Example of iterative design and make process for an individual pupil during the project

An iterative process is the relationship between a pupil’s ideas and how they are communicated and clarified through activity. This is an example of how the iterative design and make process might be experienced by an individual pupil during this project. The iterative process in primary teaching encourages active learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. It recognizes that learning is not a linear path, but rather a dynamic and evolving journey. This approach also helps students develop resilience, as they learn to embrace challenges, learn from their mistakes, and persistently work towards improvement.

Iterative Process

How will different food process create different effects?

Mixing and Stirring: Effect: Mixing and stirring ingredients together create a mixture. Learning: Students learn about ingredient integration, consistency, and how mixing affects texture and flavour. Chopping and Cutting: Effect: Chopping and cutting ingredients lead to varied shapes and sizes, affecting appearance and texture. Learning: Students develop fine motor skills, practice safe knife techniques, and understand how ingredient size influences cooking. Blending and Pureeing:Effect: Blending or pureeing creates smooth textures, ideal for soups, sauces, and smoothies. Learning: Students discover how blending breaks down ingredients, learn about consistency, and explore food transformation. Layering and Assembling:Effect: Layering and assembling ingredients create visually appealing presentations, such as salads or sandwiches. Learning: Students practice creativity, and spatial awareness, and discover how arranging ingredients affects taste and texture. Measuring and Proportioning: Effect: Measuring and proportioning ingredients accurately result in consistent flavors and textures. Learning: Students develop math skills, understand the importance of precise measurements, and explore recipes. Food Decoration:Effect: Decorating dishes with garnishes, sauces, or creative presentations adds aesthetic appeal. Learning: Students engage in artistic expression, practice attention to detail, and explore how presentation influences perception.

reading light

noise-making toy

nightlight

illuminated sign

torches

table lamp

siren for a toy vehicle

What could children design, make and evaluate?

lighting for display

hands-free head lamp

buzzer for school office

Engage students in a hands-on and interactive lesson by focusing on the theme of "Discussing, Trying Out, and Modifying the Design." This aims to introduce young learners to the principles of design thinking while incorporating the fun and nutritional aspect of working with fruits and vegetables.

Discussing, trying out and modifying the design

As students manipulate wires to create circuits, they develop spatial awareness and fine motor skills. Additionally, this hands-on approach helps demystify basic electronic principles and lays the groundwork for more advanced concepts in subsequent years of education. Overall, incorporating wire into early electronics teaching provides a tangible and exciting introduction to the world of electrical engineering for young learners.

Wires

Prior learning

  • Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell.
  • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.
Designing
  • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.
  • Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.
  • Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.
Making
  • Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g.peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.
  • Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g. colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.

3. Key learning in design and technology

Evaluating

  • Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.
  • Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.
Technical knowledge and understanding
  • Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.
  • Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.
  • Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Red Chopping Board: Raw Meat Used for cutting and preparing raw meats such as beef, pork, lamb, and game. Blue Chopping Board: Raw Fish Reserved for cutting and handling raw fish and seafood products. Green Chopping Board: Fresh Produce Used for cutting fruits, vegetables, and salads. Yellow Chopping Board: Cooked Meats For cutting and preparing cooked meats, such as roasted or grilled poultry. Brown Chopping Board: Root Vegetables Used for cutting root vegetables like potatoes, carrots, and beets. White Chopping Board: Dairy and Bakery Reserved for dairy products like cheese and for preparing bakery items like bread and pastries. It's important to note that these colour codes are not universal standards and may vary from one institution to another. However, they serve as a useful guideline to minimise the risk of cross-contamination and maintain food safety standards in school food preparation classes.

Chopping Board Colour Code

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Discussing and comparing different effects

Trying them out and evaluating.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Examples

Design, make and evaluate a fruit salad formy peers at school for sports day.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit smoothie formy parents for a party.

Design, make and evaluate a vegetable salad formy siblings at a festival.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit kebab formy grandparents on their anniversary.

• Display fruit, including photographs and associated technical vocabulary, to encourage the children to use it when discussing, designing and making a food product.• Ask the children to sort a selection of fruit and vegetables – which is which? Photo cards could be used for this.• Include fruit that is less likely to be known to the children.• Stories and poems about food could be used for inspiration and as an introduction to the project.• Visit a local shop or food market to give your project a real-life context.• Carrots can provide relatively cheap food for examining the effects of using different equipment such as grating, slicing into thin rings, slicing into sticks.• Serrated knives with rounded ends are the best.• Foods for chopping/slicing could be cut in half lengthways to provide a flat base and held still with, for example, a fork so that children cut safely.• Before you organise any food tasting in your class, you need to check your school and local authority's health and safety policy. Seek parental consent.• As homework ask children to keep a weekly fruit and vegetable diary and ask them to record their results in a chart/table. If more appropriate, focus on fruit and vegetables served in school.

Top tips

Engage students in a hands-on and interactive lesson by focusing on the theme of "Discussing, Trying Out, and Modifying the Design." This aims to introduce young learners to the principles of design thinking while incorporating the fun and nutritional aspect of working with fruits and vegetables.

Discussing, trying out and modifying the design

Tools

Make a list of tools and skills e.g. cutting, slicing and grating.

  • Aprons and Safety Gear
  • Cutting Tools
  • Chopping Boards
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Measuring Tools
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Kitchen Scales
  • Whisks and Spatulas
  • Rolling Pins
  • Oven Mitts and Pot Holders
  • Spoons and Ladles
  • Tongs
  • Baking Trays
  • Cooking Pots and Pans
  • Strainers and Colanders
  • Cookie Cutters and Molds
  • Learning Resources and Visual Aids
  • Tableware
  • Recipe Cards
  • Washing Stations
  • Cleaning Supplies

5

Your content is likable, but it only engages if it's interactive. Capture your audience's attention with an interactive photo or illustration.

Presentation

  • What order will I work in?
  • How will I present my fruit snack?
  • Will you use any garnishes or decorations to make your fruit salad visually appealing?
  • How will you store your fruit salad before it's time to serve it?
  • What type of bowl or container will you use to serve your fruit salad?
Encouraging students to consider these questions as they plan and prepare their fruit salads will not only enhance their understanding of food preparation and presentation but also promote critical thinking, creativity, and decision-making skills.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Washing: Before any processing, it's essential to wash the fruit thoroughly to remove dirt, debris, and potential contaminants. Peeling and Coring: For fruits like apples, pears, and peaches, you might want to peel them using a vegetable peeler if desired.Remove the core or pit from fruits like apples, pears, and stone fruits using a corer.Slicing and Dicing: Cut the fruit into desired shapes and sizes. Slices, wedges, cubes, or chunks are common options.Juicing: Use a juicer or a blender to extract the juice from the fruit. Strain the juice to remove pulp if desired.Blending: Blend fruits with other ingredients to make smoothies, sauces, or purees.Drying: Slice the fruit thinly and dry it in a food dehydrator or oven to make dried fruit snacks.Freezing: Cut the fruit into pieces and freeze them for later use in smoothies or cooking.Preserving: Prepare fruit preserves, jams, or jellies by cooking fruit with sugar and canning them in jars.Baking and Cooking: Use the fruit in various baked goods, such as pies, tarts, crisps, or muffins.Salads and Salsas: Combine fruits with vegetables, herbs, and seasonings to make refreshing salads or salsas.Infusing: Create flavoured water by infusing fruit slices in water or other liquids.

Processing Fruit

Examples

Design, make and evaluate a fruit salad formy peers at school for sports day.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit smoothie formy parents for a party.

Design, make and evaluate a vegetable salad formy siblings at a festival.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit kebab formy grandparents on their anniversary.

Examples

Design, make and evaluate a fruit salad formy peers at school for sports day.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit smoothie formy parents for a party.

Design, make and evaluate a vegetable salad formy siblings at a festival.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit kebab formy grandparents on their anniversary.

• When rubbing in flour and fat, keep ingredients and hands cool.• The purpose of kneading bread is to strengthen the gluten (the protein in grain such as wheat). It normally takes about 10-12 minutes by hand. When ready the dough will be smooth, elastic and hold its shape. • When developing a product e.g. soup, that requires chopping and slicing of ingredients refer to the Y3/4 Food Project Planner. • Limit the number of ingredients added to the basic recipe and discuss when is the best time to add the new or changed ingredient(s). • Emphasise the importance of accurate weighing and measuring. • Some supermarkets and bakeries will allow children to visit. This could be linked to an enterprise project with a class-based food company. • Children could design packaging for their food products as part of work on structures linked to mathematics. • Carry out a survey to find out which cultural/seasonal food products are preferred by family and friends. • For homework, encourage children to grow edible plants such

Top tips

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Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

How will different food process create different effects?

Mixing and Stirring: Effect: Mixing and stirring ingredients together create a mixture. Learning: Students learn about ingredient integration, consistency, and how mixing affects texture and flavour. Chopping and Cutting: Effect: Chopping and cutting ingredients lead to varied shapes and sizes, affecting appearance and texture. Learning: Students develop fine motor skills, practice safe knife techniques, and understand how ingredient size influences cooking. Blending and Pureeing:Effect: Blending or pureeing creates smooth textures, ideal for soups, sauces, and smoothies. Learning: Students discover how blending breaks down ingredients, learn about consistency, and explore food transformation. Layering and Assembling:Effect: Layering and assembling ingredients create visually appealing presentations, such as salads or sandwiches. Learning: Students practice creativity, and spatial awareness, and discover how arranging ingredients affects taste and texture. Measuring and Proportioning: Effect: Measuring and proportioning ingredients accurately result in consistent flavors and textures. Learning: Students develop math skills, understand the importance of precise measurements, and explore recipes. Food Decoration:Effect: Decorating dishes with garnishes, sauces, or creative presentations adds aesthetic appeal. Learning: Students engage in artistic expression, practice attention to detail, and explore how presentation influences perception.

Discussing and comparing different effects

Trying them out and evaluating.

  • To enable you to use your creativity and professional judgment to plan and teach successful D&T projects each term.
  • To help schools cover the National Curriculum requirements.
  • To provide helpful sketches, diagrams, tips and techniques that will make teaching D&T easier and more rewarding.
  • To ensure that all the D&T taught in your school enables children to design, make and evaluate functional products with users and purposes in mind.

The scheme of work has four main aims:

Aims

designtechnology.org.uk

Examples

Design, make and evaluate a fruit salad formy peers at school for sports day.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit smoothie formy parents for a party.

Design, make and evaluate a vegetable salad formy siblings at a festival.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit kebab formy grandparents on their anniversary.

2

Your content is liked, but only engages if it's interactive.Capture your audience's attention with an interactive photograph or illustration.

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  • Consectetur adipiscing elit.
  • Sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut.
  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua.

• Children examine a range of fruit/vegetables. Use questions to develop children’s understanding e.g. What is this called? Who has eaten this fruit/vegetable before? Where is it grown? When can it be harvested? What is its taste, smell, texture and appearance? What will it look like if we peel it or cut it in half? What are the different parts called? • Provide opportunities for children to handle, smell and taste fruit and vegetables in order to describe them through talking and drawing. e.g. What words can we use to describe the shape, colour, feel, taste? • Evaluate existing products to determine what the children like best; provide opportunities for the children to investigate preferences of their intended users/suitability for intended purposes e.g. What do you prefer and why? What might we want to include in our product to meet our user’s preferences? Which fruit/vegetables might be the best for our product to match the occasion/purpose?

IEAs

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Evaluating a food project in a primary school involves assessing various aspects of the project to determine its success, identify areas for improvement, and encourage reflection and learning. By carefully evaluating a food project in a primary school, you not only assess the students' achievements but also foster a culture of reflection, improvement, and continuous learning.

Evaluation

• Display fruit, including photographs and associated technical vocabulary, to encourage the children to use it when discussing, designing and making a food product.• Ask the children to sort a selection of fruit and vegetables – which is which? Photo cards could be used for this.• Include fruit that is less likely to be known to the children.• Stories and poems about food could be used for inspiration and as an introduction to the project.• Visit a local shop or food market to give your project a real-life context.• Carrots can provide relatively cheap food for examining the effects of using different equipment such as grating, slicing into thin rings, slicing into sticks.• Serrated knives with rounded ends are the best.• Foods for chopping/slicing could be cut in half lengthways to provide a flat base and held still with, for example, a fork so that children cut safely.• Before you organise any food tasting in your class, you need to check your school and local authority's health and safety policy. Seek parental consent.• As homework ask children to keep a weekly fruit and vegetable diary and ask them to record their results in a chart/table. If more appropriate, focus on fruit and vegetables served in school.

Top tips

• Set a context for designing and making which is authentic and meaningful. • Discuss with the children the possible products that they might want to design, make and evaluate and who the products will be for. Agree on design criteria that can be used to guide the development and evaluation of children’s products e.g. Who/what is the product for? What will make our product unique/different? How will we know that we designed and made a successful product?• Use talk and drawings when planning for a product; ask the children to develop, model and communicate their ideas e.g. What will you need? What fruit/vegetable will you need? How much will you need? How will you present the product?• Talk to the children about the main stages in making, considering appropriate utensils and food processes they learnt about through IEAs and FTs.• Evaluate as the children work through the project and the final products against the intended purpose and with the intended user, drawing on the design criteria previously agreed.

Design, Make and Evaluate Assignment (DMEA)

Evaluating a food project in a primary school involves assessing various aspects of the project to determine its success, identify areas for improvement, and encourage reflection and learning. By carefully evaluating a food project in a primary school, you not only assess the students' achievements but also foster a culture of reflection, improvement, and continuous learning.

Evaluation

Washing: Before any processing, it's essential to wash the fruit thoroughly to remove dirt, debris, and potential contaminants. Peeling and Coring: For fruits like apples, pears, and peaches, you might want to peel them using a vegetable peeler if desired.Remove the core or pit from fruits like apples, pears, and stone fruits using a corer.Slicing and Dicing: Cut the fruit into desired shapes and sizes. Slices, wedges, cubes, or chunks are common options.Juicing: Use a juicer or a blender to extract the juice from the fruit. Strain the juice to remove pulp if desired.Blending: Blend fruits with other ingredients to make smoothies, sauces, or purees.Drying: Slice the fruit thinly and dry it in a food dehydrator or oven to make dried fruit snacks.Freezing: Cut the fruit into pieces and freeze them for later use in smoothies or cooking.Preserving: Prepare fruit preserves, jams, or jellies by cooking fruit with sugar and canning them in jars.Baking and Cooking: Use the fruit in various baked goods, such as pies, tarts, crisps, or muffins.Salads and Salsas: Combine fruits with vegetables, herbs, and seasonings to make refreshing salads or salsas.Infusing: Create flavoured water by infusing fruit slices in water or other liquids.

Processing Fruit

Health and Safety

Pupils should be taught to work safely and hygienically, using tools, equipment, techniques and ingredients appropriate to the task. Prior to undertaking this project risk assessments should be carried out, including identifying whether there are children who are not permitted to taste or handle any food ingredients or products.

Simple Mechanisms Move...

In a straight lineIn a straight line, backwards and forwardsRound and roundIn a curve

  • Ingredient Selection
  • Design Elements
  • User Consideration
  • Purposeful Designs
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Communication Skills
  • Reflection and Growth
  • Presentation Skills
  • Culinary Awareness

Discussing and Comparing Effects

Loose and Fixed Pivots

Where children have a particularly good understanding of levers and sliders in Key Stage 1, they could be introduced to the simplest lever and linkage mechanism used in Key Stage 2. This will introduce them to the idea of loose and fixed pivots.

Discussing and comparing different effects

Trying them out and evaluating.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Presentation

  • What order will I work in?
  • How will I present my fruit snack?
  • Will you use any garnishes or decorations to make your fruit salad visually appealing?
  • How will you store your fruit salad before it's time to serve it?
  • What type of bowl or container will you use to serve your fruit salad?
Encouraging students to consider these questions as they plan and prepare their fruit salads will not only enhance their understanding of food preparation and presentation but also promote critical thinking, creativity, and decision-making skills.

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Inspect: Check the herbs for any dirt, damaged leaves, or debris. Remove any undesirable parts. Drying: Gently pat the herbs dry with a paper towel or use a salad spinner to remove excess moisture. Dry herbs are easier to cut.Cutting Different Herb Types: Woody Herbs (e.g., rosemary, thyme): Remove the leaves from the stems by running your fingers against the natural growth. The leaves can be chopped or used whole. Leafy Herbs (e.g., basil, parsley): Use the chiffonade or chopping technique to cut these herbs into smaller pieces.

Cutting

Thought

Who is it for? What will it hold? e.g. phone, money, plastic cards, pencils.

  • To enable you to use your creativity and professional judgment to plan and teach successful D&T projects each term.
  • To help schools cover the National Curriculum requirements.
  • To provide helpful sketches, diagrams, tips and techniques that will make teaching D&T easier and more rewarding.
  • To ensure that all the D&T taught in your school enables children to design, make and evaluate functional products with users and purposes in mind.

The scheme of work has four main aims:

Aims

designtechnology.org.uk

Plan of action

  • Choose a Recipe
  • Introduction and Discussion
  • Ingredients and Equipment List
  • Group Work
  • Safety Rules
  • Step-by-Step Plan
  • Visual Aids
  • Recipe Testing
  • Discuss Modifications
  • Timeline and Schedule
  • Preparation Day
  • Cooking and Assembly
  • Taste Testing and Evaluation
  • Reflection and Discussion
  • Documentation
  • Sharing and Celebration

Idea Generation

  • Brainstorming
  • Talking
  • Drawing
  • Generating Design
  • Picture Prompts
  • Class Discussions
  • Creative Writing
  • Guest Speakers
  • School trips
  • Video prompts

  • To enable you to use your creativity and professional judgment to plan and teach successful D&T projects each term.
  • To help schools cover the National Curriculum requirements.
  • To provide helpful sketches, diagrams, tips and techniques that will make teaching D&T easier and more rewarding.
  • To ensure that all the D&T taught in your school enables children to design, make and evaluate functional products with users and purposes in mind.

The scheme of work has four main aims:

Aims

designtechnology.org.uk

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod.

Lorem ipsum dolor

Lorem ipsum dolor sit

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  • Consectetur adipiscing elit.
  • Sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut.
  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

  • fruit and vegetable names, names of equipment and utensils
  • sensory vocabulary e.g. soft, juicy, crunchy, sweet, sticky, smooth, sharp, crisp, sour, hard
  • flesh, skin, seed, pip, core, slicing, peeling, cutting, squeezing, healthy diet, choosing, ingredients, planning, investigating tasting, arranging, popular, design, evaluate, criteria

Key Vocabulary

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Evaluating a food project in a primary school involves assessing various aspects of the project to determine its success, identify areas for improvement, and encourage reflection and learning. By carefully evaluating a food project in a primary school, you not only assess the students' achievements but also foster a culture of reflection, improvement, and continuous learning.

Evaluation

Festivals & Celebrations

Teddy Bear Picnic

Food and Farming

Senses

Growing

Healthy Eating

Purpose of products

Key compentencies

Problem-solving, teamwork, negotiation, consumer awareness, organisation, motivation, persuasion, leadership, perseverance, other – specify

  • Relationship between pupil's ideas and communication
  • Clarification through activity
  • Example of iterative design and make process for an individual pupil during the project

An iterative process is the relationship between a pupil’s ideas and how they are communicated and clarified through activity. This is an example of how the iterative design and make process might be experienced by an individual pupil during this project. The iterative process in primary teaching encourages active learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. It recognizes that learning is not a linear path, but rather a dynamic and evolving journey. This approach also helps students develop resilience, as they learn to embrace challenges, learn from their mistakes, and persistently work towards improvement.

Iterative Process

Knife skills education in schools plays a crucial role in empowering students with essential life skills. Watch this video from 'Food - a fact of life' for more information. www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

• When rubbing in flour and fat, keep ingredients and hands cool.• The purpose of kneading bread is to strengthen the gluten (the protein in grain such as wheat). It normally takes about 10-12 minutes by hand. When ready the dough will be smooth, elastic and hold its shape. • When developing a product e.g. soup, that requires chopping and slicing of ingredients refer to the Y3/4 Food Project Planner. • Limit the number of ingredients added to the basic recipe and discuss when is the best time to add the new or changed ingredient(s). • Emphasise the importance of accurate weighing and measuring. • Some supermarkets and bakeries will allow children to visit. This could be linked to an enterprise project with a class-based food company. • Children could design packaging for their food products as part of work on structures linked to mathematics. • Carry out a survey to find out which cultural/seasonal food products are preferred by family and friends. • For homework, encourage children to grow edible plants such

Top tips

• Children examine a range of fruit/vegetables. Use questions to develop children’s understanding e.g. What is this called? Who has eaten this fruit/vegetable before? Where is it grown? When can it be harvested? What is its taste, smell, texture and appearance? What will it look like if we peel it or cut it in half? What are the different parts called? • Provide opportunities for children to handle, smell and taste fruit and vegetables in order to describe them through talking and drawing. e.g. What words can we use to describe the shape, colour, feel, taste? • Evaluate existing products to determine what the children like best; provide opportunities for the children to investigate preferences of their intended users/suitability for intended purposes e.g. What do you prefer and why? What might we want to include in our product to meet our user’s preferences? Which fruit/vegetables might be the best for our product to match the occasion/purpose?

IEAs

Examples

Design, make and evaluate a fruit salad formy peers at school for sports day.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit smoothie formy parents for a party.

Design, make and evaluate a vegetable salad formy siblings at a festival.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit kebab formy grandparents on their anniversary.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

3

Your content is liked, but only engages if it is interactive. Capture the attention of your audience with an interactive photograph or illustration.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Or explore other options and ideas.

Prior learning

  • Constructed a simple series electrical circuit in science, using bulbs, switches and buzzers.
  • Cut and joined a variety of construction materials, such as wood, card, plastic, reclaimed materials and glue.
Designing
  • Gather information about needs and wants, and develop design criteria to inform the design of products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate realistic ideas through discussion and, as appropriate, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams.
Making
  • Order the main stages of making.
  • Select from and use tools and equipment to cut, shape, join and finish with some accuracy.
  • Select from and use materials and components, including construction materials and electrical components according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

3. Key learning in design and technology

Evaluating

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing battery-powered products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and identify the strengths and areas for improvement in their work.
Technical knowledge and understanding
  • Understand and use electrical systems in their products, such as series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs and buzzers.
  • Apply their understanding of computing to program and control their products.
  • Know and use technical vocabulary relevant to the project.

Knife skills education in schools plays a crucial role in empowering students with essential life skills. Watch this video from 'Food - a fact of life' for more information. www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

Tools

Make a list of tools and skills e.g. cutting, slicing and grating.

  • Aprons and Safety Gear
  • Cutting Tools
  • Chopping Boards
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Measuring Tools
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Kitchen Scales
  • Whisks and Spatulas
  • Rolling Pins
  • Oven Mitts and Pot Holders
  • Spoons and Ladles
  • Tongs
  • Baking Trays
  • Cooking Pots and Pans
  • Strainers and Colanders
  • Cookie Cutters and Molds
  • Learning Resources and Visual Aids
  • Tableware
  • Recipe Cards
  • Washing Stations
  • Cleaning Supplies

Tools

Make a list of tools and skills e.g. cutting, slicing and grating.

  • Aprons and Safety Gear
  • Cutting Tools
  • Chopping Boards
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Measuring Tools
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Kitchen Scales
  • Whisks and Spatulas
  • Rolling Pins
  • Oven Mitts and Pot Holders
  • Spoons and Ladles
  • Tongs
  • Baking Trays
  • Cooking Pots and Pans
  • Strainers and Colanders
  • Cookie Cutters and Molds
  • Learning Resources and Visual Aids
  • Tableware
  • Recipe Cards
  • Washing Stations
  • Cleaning Supplies

• Children examine a range of fruit/vegetables. Use questions to develop children’s understanding e.g. What is this called? Who has eaten this fruit/vegetable before? Where is it grown? When can it be harvested? What is its taste, smell, texture and appearance? What will it look like if we peel it or cut it in half? What are the different parts called? • Provide opportunities for children to handle, smell and taste fruit and vegetables in order to describe them through talking and drawing. e.g. What words can we use to describe the shape, colour, feel, taste? • Evaluate existing products to determine what the children like best; provide opportunities for the children to investigate preferences of their intended users/suitability for intended purposes e.g. What do you prefer and why? What might we want to include in our product to meet our user’s preferences? Which fruit/vegetables might be the best for our product to match the occasion/purpose?

IEAs

  • Relationship between pupil's ideas and communication
  • Clarification through activity
  • Example of iterative design and make process for an individual pupil during the project

An iterative process is the relationship between a pupil’s ideas and how they are communicated and clarified through activity. This is an example of how the iterative design and make process might be experienced by an individual pupil during this project. The iterative process in primary teaching encourages active learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. It recognizes that learning is not a linear path, but rather a dynamic and evolving journey. This approach also helps students develop resilience, as they learn to embrace challenges, learn from their mistakes, and persistently work towards improvement.

Iterative Process

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Examples

Design, make and evaluate a fruit salad formy peers at school for sports day.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit smoothie formy parents for a party.

Design, make and evaluate a vegetable salad formy siblings at a festival.

Design, make and evaluate a fruit kebab formy grandparents on their anniversary.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Fruit Yogurts

Fruit Drinks

Fruit Jelly

Fruit Smoothies

Vegetable Salads

Fruit and Vegetable Kebabs

Fruit Salads

What could children design, make and evaluate?

How will different food process create different effects?

Mixing and Stirring: Effect: Mixing and stirring ingredients together create a mixture. Learning: Students learn about ingredient integration, consistency, and how mixing affects texture and flavour. Chopping and Cutting: Effect: Chopping and cutting ingredients lead to varied shapes and sizes, affecting appearance and texture. Learning: Students develop fine motor skills, practice safe knife techniques, and understand how ingredient size influences cooking. Blending and Pureeing:Effect: Blending or pureeing creates smooth textures, ideal for soups, sauces, and smoothies. Learning: Students discover how blending breaks down ingredients, learn about consistency, and explore food transformation. Layering and Assembling:Effect: Layering and assembling ingredients create visually appealing presentations, such as salads or sandwiches. Learning: Students practice creativity, and spatial awareness, and discover how arranging ingredients affects taste and texture. Measuring and Proportioning: Effect: Measuring and proportioning ingredients accurately result in consistent flavors and textures. Learning: Students develop math skills, understand the importance of precise measurements, and explore recipes. Food Decoration:Effect: Decorating dishes with garnishes, sauces, or creative presentations adds aesthetic appeal. Learning: Students engage in artistic expression, practice attention to detail, and explore how presentation influences perception.

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Lorem ipsum dolor

Lorem ipsum dolor sit

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  • Consectetur adipiscing elit.
  • Sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut.
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Inspect: Check the herbs for any dirt, damaged leaves, or debris. Remove any undesirable parts. Drying: Gently pat the herbs dry with a paper towel or use a salad spinner to remove excess moisture. Dry herbs are easier to cut.Cutting Different Herb Types: Woody Herbs (e.g., rosemary, thyme): Remove the leaves from the stems by running your fingers against the natural growth. The leaves can be chopped or used whole. Leafy Herbs (e.g., basil, parsley): Use the chiffonade or chopping technique to cut these herbs into smaller pieces.

Cutting

Related learning in other subjects

Spoken language – ask questions to checkunderstanding; use the correct terminologyfor equipment and food processes.Writing – instructions on how to use one ofthe utensils; how to prepare e.g. a fruit foreating.Science – talk about a balanced diet, differenttypes of food and hygiene.

Plan of action

  • Choose a Recipe
  • Introduction and Discussion
  • Ingredients and Equipment List
  • Group Work
  • Safety Rules
  • Step-by-Step Plan
  • Visual Aids
  • Recipe Testing
  • Discuss Modifications
  • Timeline and Schedule
  • Preparation Day
  • Cooking and Assembly
  • Taste Testing and Evaluation
  • Reflection and Discussion
  • Documentation
  • Sharing and Celebration

Presentation

  • What order will I work in?
  • How will I present my fruit snack?
  • Will you use any garnishes or decorations to make your fruit salad visually appealing?
  • How will you store your fruit salad before it's time to serve it?
  • What type of bowl or container will you use to serve your fruit salad?
Encouraging students to consider these questions as they plan and prepare their fruit salads will not only enhance their understanding of food preparation and presentation but also promote critical thinking, creativity, and decision-making skills.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

6

Your content is liked, but it only engages when it's interactive. Capture your audience's attention with an interactive photograph or illustration.

Presentation

  • What order will I work in?
  • How will I present my fruit snack?
  • Will you use any garnishes or decorations to make your fruit salad visually appealing?
  • How will you store your fruit salad before it's time to serve it?
  • What type of bowl or container will you use to serve your fruit salad?
Encouraging students to consider these questions as they plan and prepare their fruit salads will not only enhance their understanding of food preparation and presentation but also promote critical thinking, creativity, and decision-making skills.

How will different food process create different effects?

Mixing and Stirring: Effect: Mixing and stirring ingredients together create a mixture. Learning: Students learn about ingredient integration, consistency, and how mixing affects texture and flavour. Chopping and Cutting: Effect: Chopping and cutting ingredients lead to varied shapes and sizes, affecting appearance and texture. Learning: Students develop fine motor skills, practice safe knife techniques, and understand how ingredient size influences cooking. Blending and Pureeing:Effect: Blending or pureeing creates smooth textures, ideal for soups, sauces, and smoothies. Learning: Students discover how blending breaks down ingredients, learn about consistency, and explore food transformation. Layering and Assembling:Effect: Layering and assembling ingredients create visually appealing presentations, such as salads or sandwiches. Learning: Students practice creativity, and spatial awareness, and discover how arranging ingredients affects taste and texture. Measuring and Proportioning: Effect: Measuring and proportioning ingredients accurately result in consistent flavors and textures. Learning: Students develop math skills, understand the importance of precise measurements, and explore recipes. Food Decoration:Effect: Decorating dishes with garnishes, sauces, or creative presentations adds aesthetic appeal. Learning: Students engage in artistic expression, practice attention to detail, and explore how presentation influences perception.

Related learning in other subjects

• Spoken language – ask questions to develop and check understanding, develop technical and sensory vocabulary and build knowledge. • Art and design – use and develop drawing skills.• Writing – children write a simple account about how they made their food product.• Computing – use digital photographs to help order the main stages of making and support children’s writing.

Focused Tasks

Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

• Children examine a range of fruit/vegetables. Use questions to develop children’s understanding e.g. What is this called? Who has eaten this fruit/vegetable before? Where is it grown? When can it be harvested? What is its taste, smell, texture and appearance? What will it look like if we peel it or cut it in half? What are the different parts called? • Provide opportunities for children to handle, smell and taste fruit and vegetables in order to describe them through talking and drawing. e.g. What words can we use to describe the shape, colour, feel, taste? • Evaluate existing products to determine what the children like best; provide opportunities for the children to investigate preferences of their intended users/suitability for intended purposes e.g. What do you prefer and why? What might we want to include in our product to meet our user’s preferences? Which fruit/vegetables might be the best for our product to match the occasion/purpose?

IEAs

What is the purpose of the product?

How will a frame structure be used in my design? Will my product appeal to my intended user?

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Prior learning

  • Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell.
  • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.
Designing
  • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.
  • Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.
  • Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.
Making
  • Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g.peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.
  • Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g. colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.

3. Key learning in design and technology

Evaluating

  • Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.
  • Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.
Technical knowledge and understanding
  • Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.
  • Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.
  • Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

The use of wire plays a crucial role in introducing students to fundamental concepts of circuitry and electrical connections. Students at this stage are typically introduced to simple circuits, where they learn how to create a closed loop for electricity to flow. Using wires, they connect components such as batteries, bulbs, and switches, gaining hands-on experience in constructing basic circuits.

Iterative Process

An iterative process is the relationship between a pupil’s ideas and how they are communicated and clarified through activity. This is an example of how the iterative design and make process might be experienced by an individual pupil during this project.

Engage students in a hands-on and interactive lesson by focusing on the theme of "Discussing, Trying Out, and Modifying the Design." This aims to introduce young learners to the principles of design thinking while incorporating the fun and nutritional aspect of working with fruits and vegetables.

Discussing, trying out and modifying the design

Squeezing juice is an excellent way to enjoy the natural flavors and nutrients of fruits and vegetables. Whether you're making a glass of refreshing citrus juice or experimenting with different fruit combinations, the process is straightforward and rewarding.

Squeezing juice is a simple yet effective method of extracting the liquid content from fruits and vegetables. This process is commonly used to create fresh and flavorful juices for drinking or cooking.

Juicing

Presentation

  • What order will I work in?
  • How will I present my fruit snack?
  • Will you use any garnishes or decorations to make your fruit salad visually appealing?
  • How will you store your fruit salad before it's time to serve it?
  • What type of bowl or container will you use to serve your fruit salad?
Encouraging students to consider these questions as they plan and prepare their fruit salads will not only enhance their understanding of food preparation and presentation but also promote critical thinking, creativity, and decision-making skills.

Festivals & Celebrations

Teddy Bear Picnic

Food and Farming

Senses

Growing

Healthy Eating

Purpose of products

Idea Generation

  • Brainstorming
  • Talking
  • Drawing
  • Generating Design
  • Picture Prompts
  • Class Discussions
  • Creative Writing
  • Guest Speakers
  • School trips
  • Video prompts

Resources

• range of fresh fruit and vegetables• chopping boards, knives, peelers, graters, skewers,juicers, spoons, jugs, plates, bowls, aprons, plastictable covers, whisks, hand washing and washing-up facilities• yogurt making machine or blender, if appropriate

Design Thinking

User Empathy: Identify the "user" of the fruit salad.Purpose Analysis: Break down the purpose of the fruit salad – a snack, colourful addition to lunch, or a healthy dessert. Nutrition Discussion: Explore nutritional value, linking choices to a balanced, enjoyable eating experience. Visual Appeal: Delve into the visual aspects – arrangement, colours, and presentation – connecting to art and aesthetics for creative expression.Practicality Check: Discuss practical aspects of preparation and serving, emphasizing resource availability in a classroom or home kitchen. Reflection & Modification: Encourage students to reflect on designs and make modifications, fostering a growth mindset through iterative improvements.

Plan of action

  • Choose a Recipe
  • Introduction and Discussion
  • Ingredients and Equipment List
  • Group Work
  • Safety Rules
  • Step-by-Step Plan
  • Visual Aids
  • Recipe Testing
  • Discuss Modifications
  • Timeline and Schedule
  • Preparation Day
  • Cooking and Assembly
  • Taste Testing and Evaluation
  • Reflection and Discussion
  • Documentation
  • Sharing and Celebration

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Festivals & Celebrations

Teddy Bear Picnic

Food and Farming

Senses

Growing

Healthy Eating

Purpose of products

Discussing and comparing different effects

Trying them out and evaluating.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

  • Tinkercad is free and cloud-based based so it can be used on any platform. Sign up as an educator and create a class to allow children to access.
  • Look at objects and furniture around the home to see how they use frames as structures.
  • Make a collection of frame structures of various shapes and materials.
  • Put together an image board of structures so children can see the range of different construction methods.
  • Discuss environmental issues relating to the wastage of materials when making complex structures including the three R’s - reducing, recycling and reusing.
  • In Tinkercad there are ‘Everyday Objects’ such as dowel, lolly sticks and thumbtacks that could be used to be an accurate representation of the physical structure.
  • You may want to restrict children to using particular standard shapes when designing their structures and final products (think wooden sections and paper straws).
  • Ensure that the children include sufficient support in their designs if they are intended to support items of value.
  • Use the simulation tools in Tinkercad to experiment with different structural designs, materials and forces.
  • Start with the Tinkercad ‘Basic Shapes’ then use copy and paste to create a range of similar support elements.
  • Ensure that the children have a good understanding of the associated vocabulary and of 2D and 3D shapes in maths before carrying out this project.
  • When using Tinkercad, give children constraints such as size, number of components and/or what it must hold.
  • Consider sharing a pre-made Tinkercad design with them, for children to edit/improve.

Top tips

  • To enable you to use your creativity and professional judgment to plan and teach successful D&T projects each term.
  • To help schools cover the National Curriculum requirements.
  • To provide helpful sketches, diagrams, tips and techniques that will make teaching D&T easier and more rewarding.
  • To ensure that all the D&T taught in your school enables children to design, make and evaluate functional products with users and purposes in mind.

The scheme of work has four main aims:

Aims

designtechnology.org.uk

Thought...

Who am I making the snack for? What is it for? How can I make it appealing for the range of users? What kind of snack shall I make? What ingredients could it contain? How could it be innovative?

Back Stitch Explained: A back stitch is like creating a train track with your needle and thread. Imagine your needle as the train, and the thread as its path. To make a back stitch: Start: Bring your needle up from the back of the fabric, just like starting a regular stitch. Move Back: Instead of moving forward, take the needle backward, making a small stitch in the opposite direction. This is like the train moving backward on the track. Move Forward: Now, bring the needle forward, creating another small stitch. The train is moving forward again. Repeat: Keep alternating between moving backward and forward, creating a series of stitches that lock together. Each stitch overlaps the previous one, making a sturdy line. End: Secure your back stitch by making a small knot at the end. Why Use Back Stitch: Back stitches are super strong and reliable. They're like the superhero of stitches, perfect for sewing buttons, fixing seams, or creating anything that needs extra strength.

Tools

Make a list of tools and skills e.g. cutting, slicing and grating.

  • Aprons and Safety Gear
  • Cutting Tools
  • Chopping Boards
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Measuring Tools
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Kitchen Scales
  • Whisks and Spatulas
  • Rolling Pins
  • Oven Mitts and Pot Holders
  • Spoons and Ladles
  • Tongs
  • Baking Trays
  • Cooking Pots and Pans
  • Strainers and Colanders
  • Cookie Cutters and Molds
  • Learning Resources and Visual Aids
  • Tableware
  • Recipe Cards
  • Washing Stations
  • Cleaning Supplies

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Storybook

Poster

Display

Greetings Card

Class/Group Information

Book

Class/group

What could children design, make and evaluate?

Storyboard

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

4

Your content is liked, but only engages if it is interactive. Capture your audience's attention with an interactive photograph or illustration.

The consistency of an apple is generally firm and crunchy, especially when it is fresh and ripe. When you take a bite into an apple, you'll typically experience a satisfying crunch as your teeth break through the outer skin and into the juicy flesh beneath. However, the exact consistency can vary based on the variety of apple. Some apples are known for being exceptionally crisp and firm, while others might be a bit softer and juicier. The texture of an apple can also change as it ripens. For example, a ripe apple might still be firm but slightly less crunchy than an apple that's just been picked.

Apple

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Or explore other options and ideas.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Inspect: Check the herbs for any dirt, damaged leaves, or debris. Remove any undesirable parts. Drying: Gently pat the herbs dry with a paper towel or use a salad spinner to remove excess moisture. Dry herbs are easier to cut.Cutting Different Herb Types: Woody Herbs (e.g., rosemary, thyme): Remove the leaves from the stems by running your fingers against the natural growth. The leaves can be chopped or used whole. Leafy Herbs (e.g., basil, parsley): Use the chiffonade or chopping technique to cut these herbs into smaller pieces.

Bulb Holder

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Prior learning

  • Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell.
  • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.
Designing
  • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.
  • Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.
  • Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.
Making
  • Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g.peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.
  • Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g. colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.

3. Key learning in design and technology

Evaluating

  • Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.
  • Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.
Technical knowledge and understanding
  • Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.
  • Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.
  • Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Method: Put the butter in a bowl and beat using electric beaters until soft and creamy. Beat in the sugar, then the egg and vanilla (optional), and finally the flour. If the dough feels sticky, add more flour and knead it in.

Biscuits

  • Unsalted Butter
  • Golden Caster Sugar
  • Eggs
  • Vanilla Extract
  • Plain Flour

Resources

• range of fresh fruit and vegetables• chopping boards, knives, peelers, graters, skewers,juicers, spoons, jugs, plates, bowls, aprons, plastictable covers, whisks, hand washing and washing-up facilities• yogurt making machine or blender, if appropriate

Washing: Before any processing, it's essential to wash the fruit thoroughly to remove dirt, debris, and potential contaminants. Peeling and Coring: For fruits like apples, pears, and peaches, you might want to peel them using a vegetable peeler if desired.Remove the core or pit from fruits like apples, pears, and stone fruits using a corer.Slicing and Dicing: Cut the fruit into desired shapes and sizes. Slices, wedges, cubes, or chunks are common options.Juicing: Use a juicer or a blender to extract the juice from the fruit. Strain the juice to remove pulp if desired.Blending: Blend fruits with other ingredients to make smoothies, sauces, or purees.Drying: Slice the fruit thinly and dry it in a food dehydrator or oven to make dried fruit snacks.Freezing: Cut the fruit into pieces and freeze them for later use in smoothies or cooking.Preserving: Prepare fruit preserves, jams, or jellies by cooking fruit with sugar and canning them in jars.Baking and Cooking: Use the fruit in various baked goods, such as pies, tarts, crisps, or muffins.Salads and Salsas: Combine fruits with vegetables, herbs, and seasonings to make refreshing salads or salsas.Infusing: Create flavoured water by infusing fruit slices in water or other liquids.

Processing Fruit

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Design Thinking

User Empathy: Identify the "user" of the fruit salad.Purpose Analysis: Break down the purpose of the fruit salad – a snack, colourful addition to lunch, or a healthy dessert. Nutrition Discussion: Explore nutritional value, linking choices to a balanced, enjoyable eating experience. Visual Appeal: Delve into the visual aspects – arrangement, colours, and presentation – connecting to art and aesthetics for creative expression.Practicality Check: Discuss practical aspects of preparation and serving, emphasising resource availability in a classroom or home kitchen. Reflection & Modification: Encourage students to reflect on designs and make modifications, fostering a growth mindset through iterative improvements.

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Fruit Yogurts

Fruit Drinks

Fruit Jelly

Fruit Smoothies

Vegetable Salads

Fruit and Vegetable Kebabs

Fruit Salads

What could children design, make and evaluate?

Or explore other options and ideas.

Squeezing juice is an excellent way to enjoy the natural flavors and nutrients of fruits and vegetables. Whether you're making a glass of refreshing citrus juice or experimenting with different fruit combinations, the process is straightforward and rewarding.

Squeezing juice is a simple yet effective method of extracting the liquid content from fruits and vegetables. This process is commonly used to create fresh and flavorful juices for drinking or cooking.

Juicing

Prior learning

  • Early experiences of working with paper and card to make simple flaps and hinges.
  • Experience of simple cutting, shaping and joining skills using scissors, glue, paper fasteners and masking tape.
Designing
  • Generate ideas based on simple design criteria and their own experiences, explaining what they could make.
  • Develop, model and communicate their ideas through drawings and mock-ups with card and paper.
Making
  • Plan by suggesting what to do next.
  • Select and use tools, explaining their choices, to cut, shape and join paper and card.
  • Use simple finishing techniques suitable for the product they are creating.

Key learning in design and technology

Evaluating

  • Explore a range of existing books and everyday products that use simple sliders and levers.
  • Evaluate their product by discussing how well it works in relation to the purpose and the user and whether it meets design criteria.
Technical knowledge and understanding
  • Explore and use sliders and levers.
  • Understand that different mechanisms produce different types of movement.
  • Know and use technical vocabulary relevant to the project.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

The Electrical Connecting Block is designed to introduce students to the basic components of an electrical circuit. It typically consists of the following elements: Baseboard: The foundation of the connecting block, where various components can be attached securely. Conductive Strips: These strips act as pathways for the flow of electricity. They are usually made of conductive materials, allowing students to create simple circuits by connecting different components. Terminals: These are connection points on the conductive strips where students can attach wires, bulbs, and other components. Terminals ensure a secure and safe connection. Wires: Coloured wires with alligator clips at the ends allow students to connect different components and create pathways for electricity to flow. Switches: Simple on/off switches are integrated into the connecting block, enabling students to understand the concept of interrupting or completing a circuit.Understanding CircuitsThe connecting block introduces the concept of a circuit as a closed loop for electricity to flow. Students learn to create circuits by connecting wires and components on the baseboard.

Connecting Block

  • Relationship between pupil's ideas and communication
  • Clarification through activity
  • Example of iterative design and make process for an individual pupil during the project

An iterative process is the relationship between a pupil’s ideas and how they are communicated and clarified through activity. This is an example of how the iterative design and make process might be experienced by an individual pupil during this project. The iterative process in primary teaching encourages active learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. It recognizes that learning is not a linear path, but rather a dynamic and evolving journey. This approach also helps students develop resilience, as they learn to embrace challenges, learn from their mistakes, and persistently work towards improvement.

Iterative Process

Equipment:Non-stick baking tray, pastry brush, weighing scales, sieve, mixing bowl, measuring spoons, grater, chopping board, measuring jug, flour dredger, rolling pin, scone cutter, cooling rack.Tips:You could experiment with different flavourings by adding herbs or spices.

Savoury Scones

  • Ingredient Selection
  • Design Elements
  • User Consideration
  • Purposeful Designs
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Communication Skills
  • Reflection and Growth
  • Presentation Skills
  • Culinary Awareness

Discussing and Comparing Effects

What sort of fruit product should I make?

Who will it be for? Which fruit will I put into my salad?Will my product appeal to the intended user?

Festivals & Celebrations

Teddy Bear Picnic

Food and Farming

Senses

Growing

Healthy Eating

Purpose of products

6 top tips:1. It helps to sieve the flour and baking powder together to ensure the rising agent is evenly distributed. If you prefer, you can mix them together using a whisk. 2. Keep the mixture cool by not handling it too much and using fridge-cold milk and eggs. Mary uses softened butter for ease, but it should be just soft enough to squash the pieces easily between your fingers – you don’t want it on the verge of melting. 3. Don’t overwork the dough – once it comes together the less you handle it the better. 4. The dough should be soft and slightly sticky. Too much flour will make your scones heavy, so don’t add a lot of flour when rolling out the dough (you need just enough to stop the dough sticking to your worksurface). 5. When cutting out the scones, the dough should be about 2cm/¾in thick. If you roll it out too thin your scones will be flat; too thick and they are likely to lean to one side when baking. 6. To help scones rise evenly, always cut the scones straight down and up, without twisting the cutter. It helps to rub the cutter in flour first and remove any sticky bits of dough that become attached when cutting. When brushing the tops take care to ensure there are no dribbles down the sides as this will affect the rise.

Scones

Idea Generation

  • Brainstorming
  • Talking
  • Drawing
  • Generating Design
  • Picture Prompts
  • Class Discussions
  • Creative Writing
  • Guest Speakers
  • School trips
  • Video prompts

This project should be undertaken either around the same time or soon after electricity is covered in science. • Use a selection of images of existing battery-powered products to add to the actual products that children investigate and evaluate. • Check the condition of the batteries prior to activities. • Stress the need for making secure connections. • To reduce the number of requests for help, model the fault-finding process: check all the connections, ensure that bulbs are screwed in tightly and ensure that components are correctly connected. • Have a ‘working’ circuit set up so that children can test suspect components. • Some components (e.g. buzzers) need to be connected the right way round in a circuit, ensuring positive and negative match the poles of the battery. • Make sure bulbs and batteries match e.g. 1.5v bulb with a 1.5v battery. • Do not use rechargeable batteries. • It is recommened to use zinc carbon and zinc chloride batteries for Primary schools, not rechargeable, lithium of alkaline as these can overheat if short circuited. Button batteries are not recommended for younger children.

Top tips

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Lorem ipsum dolor

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  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.
  • Consectetur adipiscing elit.
  • Sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut.
  • Labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Pleasure

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Prior learning

  • Have knowledge and understanding about food hygiene, nutrition, healthy eating and a varied diet.
  • Be able to use appropriate equipment and utensils, and apply a range of techniques for measuring out, preparing and combining ingredients.
Designing
  • Generate innovative ideas through research and discussion with peers and adults to develop a design brief and criteria for a design specification.
  • Explore a range of initial ideas, and make design decisions to develop a final product linked to user and purpose.
  • Use words, annotated sketches and information and communication technology as appropriate to develop and communicate ideas.
Making
  • Write a step-by-step recipe, including a list of ingredients, equipment and utensils
  • Select and use appropriate utensils and equipment accurately to measure and combine appropriate ingredients.
  • Make, decorate and present the food product appropriately for the intended user and purpose.

3. Key learning in design and technology

Evaluating

  • Carry out sensory evaluations of a range of relevant products and ingredients. Record the evaluations using e.g. tables/graphs/charts such as star diagrams.
  • Evaluate the final product with reference back to the design brief and design specification, taking into account the views of others when identifying improvements.
  • Understand how key chefs have influenced eating habits to promote varied and healthy diets.
Technical knowledge and understanding
  • Know how to use utensils and equipment including heat sources to prepare and cook food.
  • Understand about seasonality in relation to food products and the source of different food products.
  • Know and use relevant technical and sensory vocabulary.

  • Ingredient Selection
  • Design Elements
  • User Consideration
  • Purposeful Designs
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Communication Skills
  • Reflection and Growth
  • Presentation Skills
  • Culinary Awareness

Discussing and Comparing Effects

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Moving Pictures

As an enhancement to this project children could add flaps to their moving pictures. Some children may find flaps, which can be used to make a picture appear and disappear, easier to make than levers or sliders.

ADD Moving Graphic

Design Thinking

User Empathy: Identify the "user" of the fruit salad.Purpose Analysis: Break down the purpose of the fruit salad – a snack, colourful addition to lunch, or a healthy dessert. Nutrition Discussion: Explore nutritional value, linking choices to a balanced, enjoyable eating experience. Visual Appeal: Delve into the visual aspects – arrangement, colours, and presentation – connecting to art and aesthetics for creative expression.Practicality Check: Discuss practical aspects of preparation and serving, emphasizing resource availability in a classroom or home kitchen. Reflection & Modification: Encourage students to reflect on designs and make modifications, fostering a growth mindset through iterative improvements.

Celebration

Party

School Event

Sports Day

Cafe

Meeting

Picnic

Purpose of products

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Evaluating a food project in a primary school involves assessing various aspects of the project to determine its success, identify areas for improvement, and encourage reflection and learning. By carefully evaluating a food project in a primary school, you not only assess the students' achievements but also foster a culture of reflection, improvement, and continuous learning.

Evaluation

Resources

• range of fresh fruit and vegetables• chopping boards, knives, peelers, graters, skewers,juicers, spoons, jugs, plates, bowls, aprons, plastictable covers, whisks, hand washing and washing-up facilities• yogurt making machine or blender, if appropriate

Pizza

Savoury Biscuits

Savoury Scones

Savoury muffins

Vegetable Salads

Soup

Bread

What could children design, make and evaluate?

Keep your fingers and hands away from the grating surface to avoid injury. Consider using a safety glove or a fork to hold the ingredient.For soft or moist ingredients, such as cheese or chocolate, place them in the freezer for a short while before grating to make the process easier. When grating vegetables like carrots start with the larger holes and then switch to finer holes for a smoother texture. Work with a firm grip and use smooth, controlled motions to prevent the ingredient from slipping or becoming unevenly grated. Pay attention to your knuckles and fingers to avoid accidentally grating them. To remove excess grated material from the grater, gently tap it against a bowl or the counter.

Grating

Red Chopping Board: Raw Meat Used for cutting and preparing raw meats such as beef, pork, lamb, and game. Blue Chopping Board: Raw Fish Reserved for cutting and handling raw fish and seafood products. Green Chopping Board: Fresh Produce Used for cutting fruits, vegetables, and salads. Yellow Chopping Board: Cooked Meats For cutting and preparing cooked meats, such as roasted or grilled poultry. Brown Chopping Board: Root Vegetables Used for cutting root vegetables like potatoes, carrots, and beets. White Chopping Board: Dairy and Bakery Reserved for dairy products like cheese and for preparing bakery items like bread and pastries. It's important to note that these colour codes are not universal standards and may vary from one institution to another. However, they serve as a useful guideline to minimise the risk of cross-contamination and maintain food safety standards in school food preparation classes.

Chopping Board Colour Code

Festivals & Celebrations

Teddy Bear Picnic

Food and Farming

Senses

Growing

Healthy Eating

Purpose of products

Discussing and comparing different effects

Trying them out and evaluating.

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Red Chopping Board: Raw Meat Used for cutting and preparing raw meats such as beef, pork, lamb, and game. Blue Chopping Board: Raw Fish Reserved for cutting and handling raw fish and seafood products. Green Chopping Board: Fresh Produce Used for cutting fruits, vegetables, and salads. Yellow Chopping Board: Cooked Meats For cutting and preparing cooked meats, such as roasted or grilled poultry. Brown Chopping Board: Root Vegetables Used for cutting root vegetables like potatoes, carrots, and beets. White Chopping Board: Dairy and Bakery Reserved for dairy products like cheese and for preparing bakery items like bread and pastries. It's important to note that these colour codes are not universal standards and may vary from one institution to another. However, they serve as a useful guideline to minimise the risk of cross-contamination and maintain food safety standards in school food preparation classes.

Chopping Board Colour Code

Washing: Before any processing, it's essential to wash the fruit thoroughly to remove dirt, debris, and potential contaminants. Peeling and Coring: For fruits like apples, pears, and peaches, you might want to peel them using a vegetable peeler if desired.Remove the core or pit from fruits like apples, pears, and stone fruits using a corer.Slicing and Dicing: Cut the fruit into desired shapes and sizes. Slices, wedges, cubes, or chunks are common options.Juicing: Use a juicer or a blender to extract the juice from the fruit. Strain the juice to remove pulp if desired.Blending: Blend fruits with other ingredients to make smoothies, sauces, or purees.Drying: Slice the fruit thinly and dry it in a food dehydrator or oven to make dried fruit snacks.Freezing: Cut the fruit into pieces and freeze them for later use in smoothies or cooking.Preserving: Prepare fruit preserves, jams, or jellies by cooking fruit with sugar and canning them in jars.Baking and Cooking: Use the fruit in various baked goods, such as pies, tarts, crisps, or muffins.Salads and Salsas: Combine fruits with vegetables, herbs, and seasonings to make refreshing salads or salsas.Infusing: Create flavoured water by infusing fruit slices in water or other liquids.

Processing Fruit

Engage students in a hands-on and interactive lesson by focusing on the theme of "Discussing, Trying Out, and Modifying the Design." This aims to introduce young learners to the principles of design thinking while incorporating the fun and nutritional aspect of working with fruits and vegetables.

Discussing, trying out and modifying the design

• Children examine a range of fruit/vegetables. Use questions to develop children’s understanding e.g. What is this called? Who has eaten this fruit/vegetable before? Where is it grown? When can it be harvested? What is its taste, smell, texture and appearance? What will it look like if we peel it or cut it in half? What are the different parts called? • Provide opportunities for children to handle, smell and taste fruit and vegetables in order to describe them through talking and drawing. e.g. What words can we use to describe the shape, colour, feel, taste? • Evaluate existing products to determine what the children like best; provide opportunities for the children to investigate preferences of their intended users/suitability for intended purposes e.g. What do you prefer and why? What might we want to include in our product to meet our user’s preferences? Which fruit/vegetables might be the best for our product to match the occasion/purpose?

IEAs

Tools

Make a list of tools and skills e.g. cutting, slicing and grating.

  • Aprons and Safety Gear
  • Cutting Tools
  • Chopping Boards
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Measuring Tools
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Kitchen Scales
  • Whisks and Spatulas
  • Rolling Pins
  • Oven Mitts and Pot Holders
  • Spoons and Ladles
  • Tongs
  • Baking Trays
  • Cooking Pots and Pans
  • Strainers and Colanders
  • Cookie Cutters and Molds
  • Learning Resources and Visual Aids
  • Tableware
  • Recipe Cards
  • Washing Stations
  • Cleaning Supplies

Fruit juice typically has a smooth and slightly pulpy texture. It is liquid in form, with a consistency that is neither too thick nor too thin. The pulp adds a bit of thickness and chewiness to the texture, enhancing the overall mouthfeel.Other Citrus Fruits:

  • Oranges
  • Grapefruits
  • Lemons
  • Limes
  • Tangerines
  • Mandarins

Juice

Focused Tasks

• Discuss basic food hygiene practices when handling food including the importance of following instructions to control risk e.g. What should we do before we work with food? Why is following instructions important? • Demonstrate how to use simple utensils and provide opportunities for the children to practise food-processing skills such as washing, grating, peeling, slicing, squeezing e.g. Do we eat the whole fruit? Why or why not? Which parts do we eat? What might we have to do before eating this? Why do we cut, grate, peel and slice in this way? Discuss different effects achieved by different processes. • Discuss healthy eating advice, including eating more fruit and vegetables; using The Eatwell Guide model talk about the importance of fruit and vegetables in our balanced diet e.g. Why is it good to eat fruit and vegetables? How many pieces of fruit/vegetables do you eat per day? Why is it important to wash fruit/vegetables before we eat them?

Science – understand that plants have leaves, stems, roots, flowers and fruits; understand the importance of growing plants and how seasons affect growth.Spoken language – children develop and use a sensory vocabulary. Writing – develop descriptive writing based on first-hand experience of tasting fruit and vegetables.Mathematics – carry out a simple survey to find out which are the favourite fruits/vegetables; construct and interpret the information in e.g. pictograms and bar graphs.

Related learning in other subjects

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Crunchy: Carrots are often appreciated for their crisp and crunchy texture, especially when they are fresh and raw. The satisfying crunch is a defining characteristic of carrots and makes them a popular choice for snacks and salads. Tender: Cooking carrots can soften their texture, making them more tender and easier to bite into. Steamed, boiled, or roasted carrots can develop a softer, but still slightly firm, texture. Juicy: Carrots have a high water content, which contributes to their juiciness. When you bite into a carrot, you might notice a refreshing burst of moisture. Fibrous: Carrots contain dietary fiber, which can give them a slightly fibrous texture, especially closer to the core. While some people enjoy this texture, others might prefer to remove the tougher parts before consumption.

Carrots

Design Thinking

User Empathy: Identify the "user" of the fruit salad.Purpose Analysis: Break down the purpose of the fruit salad – a snack, colourful addition to lunch, or a healthy dessert. Nutrition Discussion: Explore nutritional value, linking choices to a balanced, enjoyable eating experience. Visual Appeal: Delve into the visual aspects – arrangement, colours, and presentation – connecting to art and aesthetics for creative expression.Practicality Check: Discuss practical aspects of preparation and serving, emphasizing resource availability in a classroom or home kitchen. Reflection & Modification: Encourage students to reflect on designs and make modifications, fostering a growth mindset through iterative improvements.

Fruit Yogurts

Fruit Drinks

Fruit Jelly

Fruit Smoothies

Vegetable Salads

Fruit and Vegetable Kebabs

Fruit Salads

What could children design, make and evaluate?

What sort of fruit product should I make?

Who will it be for? Which fruit will I put into my salad?Will my product appeal to the intended user?

  • Using books and prepared examples of simple mechanisms, ask children to explain how the sliders and levers work.
  • Prepare plenty of pre-cut strips of card for making the levers and sliders.
  • To make a small hole for the pivot, a pencil can be used by placing the thin card over a piece of Plasticine or Blu Tack and pressing the pencil through.
  • Guides/bridges can be made using strips of card fixed with masking tape.
  • Display technical vocabulary and encourage the children to use it when discussing mechanisms and when designing and making.
  • Make sure the existing books children investigate include moving pictures that are similar to the teaching aids.
  • Mechanisms are operated directly by the children e.g. the slider is pushed and a snail appears from behind a stone.
  • The mechanisms that children use are found in everyday products in the classroom or the school grounds. For example, levers are used to make door handles and sliders are used to make children’s trays.
  • Think about directional language e.g. sliders move in a straight line and levers move in a curve.
  • Children may need extra support when they are attaching paper fasteners to levers.

Top tips

Plan of action

  • Choose a Recipe
  • Introduction and Discussion
  • Ingredients and Equipment List
  • Group Work
  • Safety Rules
  • Step-by-Step Plan
  • Visual Aids
  • Recipe Testing
  • Discuss Modifications
  • Timeline and Schedule
  • Preparation Day
  • Cooking and Assembly
  • Taste Testing and Evaluation
  • Reflection and Discussion
  • Documentation
  • Sharing and Celebration

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

People with special dietary needs

Consumers from a variety of cultures

Manual Peeling: This involves using a knife, peeler, or your fingers to carefully remove the skin from the fruit.Blanching: Some fruits, like tomatoes and peaches, can be blanched in boiling water for a short time and then immersed in cold water. This makes the peeling process easier. Abrasive Methods: Certain fruits, such as oranges, can be peeled by gently rubbing the skin with a rough cloth or sponge. Mechanical Peeling: Industrial settings often use machines to peel large quantities of fruits quickly and efficiently. Reasons for Peeling:Texture and Taste: The skin of some fruits can be tough, fibrous, or bitter, making them more palatable and enjoyable after peeling. Safety: Peeling can remove potential contaminants, dirt, and pesticides from the surface of the fruit, reducing the risk of ingesting harmful substances. Cooking and Culinary Use: Many recipes call for peeled fruit to achieve a smoother texture or to avoid altering the color and flavor of the dish. Aesthetic Purposes: In some cases, peeling fruit enhances its visual appeal, making it more attractive for presentation. Common Fruits That Are Peeled: Citrus Fruits: Oranges, grapefruits, lemons, and limes are often peeled due to their thick and bitter rinds. Bananas: While the skin of bananas is edible, it is usually removed before consumption. Mangoes: The tough skin of mangoes is removed to access the sweet, juicy flesh. Kiwi: The fuzzy skin of kiwi is typically peeled to reveal the vibrant green fruit inside. Pineapples: The prickly skin of pineapples is removed, leaving the delicious fruit underneath. Melons: The rinds of watermelons, cantaloupes, and honeydews are often removed to expose the juicy flesh.

Fruit Peeling

  • Ingredient Selection
  • Design Elements
  • User Consideration
  • Purposeful Designs
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Communication Skills
  • Reflection and Growth
  • Presentation Skills
  • Culinary Awareness

Discussing and Comparing Effects

Keep your fingers and hands away from the grating surface to avoid injury. Consider using a safety glove or a fork to hold the ingredient.For soft or moist ingredients, such as cheese or chocolate, place them in the freezer for a short while before grating to make the process easier. When grating vegetables like carrots start with the larger holes and then switch to finer holes for a smoother texture. Work with a firm grip and use smooth, controlled motions to prevent the ingredient from slipping or becoming unevenly grated. Pay attention to your knuckles and fingers to avoid accidentally grating them. To remove excess grated material from the grater, gently tap it against a bowl or the counter.

Grating

Prior learning• Experience of common fruit and vegetables, undertaking sensory activities i.e. appearance taste and smell. • Experience of cutting soft fruit and vegetables using appropriate utensils.Designing • Design appealing products for a particular user based on simple design criteria.• Generate initial ideas and design criteria through investigating a variety of fruit and vegetables.• Communicate these ideas through talk and drawings.Making• Use simple utensils and equipment to e.g. peel, cut, slice, squeeze, grate and chop safely.• Select from a range of fruit and vegetables according to their characteristics e.g.colour, texture and taste to create a chosen product.Evaluating• Taste and evaluate a range of fruit and vegetables to determine the intended user’s preferences.• Evaluate ideas and finished products against design criteria, including intended user and purpose.Technical knowledge and understanding• Understand where a range of fruit and vegetables come from e.g. farmed or grown at home.• Understand and use basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes, including how fruit and vegetables are part of The Eatwell Guide.• Know and use technical and sensory vocabulary relevant to the project.

Parents

Siblings

Grandparents

Friends and Peers

Younger Children

Older Children

Visitors

Themselves

Intended User

Resources

• range of fresh fruit and vegetables• chopping boards, knives, peelers, graters, skewers,juicers, spoons, jugs, plates, bowls, aprons, plastictable covers, whisks, hand washing and washing-up facilities• yogurt making machine or blender, if appropriate

How will different food process create different effects?

Mixing and Stirring: Effect: Mixing and stirring ingredients together create a mixture. Learning: Students learn about ingredient integration, consistency, and how mixing affects texture and flavour. Chopping and Cutting: Effect: Chopping and cutting ingredients lead to varied shapes and sizes, affecting appearance and texture. Learning: Students develop fine motor skills, practice safe knife techniques, and understand how ingredient size influences cooking. Blending and Pureeing:Effect: Blending or pureeing creates smooth textures, ideal for soups, sauces, and smoothies. Learning: Students discover how blending breaks down ingredients, learn about consistency, and explore food transformation. Layering and Assembling:Effect: Layering and assembling ingredients create visually appealing presentations, such as salads or sandwiches. Learning: Students practice creativity, and spatial awareness, and discover how arranging ingredients affects taste and texture. Measuring and Proportioning: Effect: Measuring and proportioning ingredients accurately result in consistent flavors and textures. Learning: Students develop math skills, understand the importance of precise measurements, and explore recipes. Food Decoration:Effect: Decorating dishes with garnishes, sauces, or creative presentations adds aesthetic appeal. Learning: Students engage in artistic expression, practice attention to detail, and explore how presentation influences perception.

Evaluating a food project in a primary school involves assessing various aspects of the project to determine its success, identify areas for improvement, and encourage reflection and learning. By carefully evaluating a food project in a primary school, you not only assess the students' achievements but also foster a culture of reflection, improvement, and continuous learning.

Evaluation

1

Your content is appreciated, but it only engages if it's interactive. Capture your audience's attention with an interactive photo or illustration.

Festivals & Celebrations

Teddy Bear Picnic

Food and Farming

Senses

Growing

Healthy Eating

Purpose of products

Squeezing juice is an excellent way to enjoy the natural flavors and nutrients of fruits and vegetables. Whether you're making a glass of refreshing citrus juice or experimenting with different fruit combinations, the process is straightforward and rewarding.

Squeezing juice is a simple yet effective method of extracting the liquid content from fruits and vegetables. This process is commonly used to create fresh and flavorful juices for drinking or cooking.

Juicing

• Children examine a range of fruit/vegetables. Use questions to develop children’s understanding e.g. What is this called? Who has eaten this fruit/vegetable before? Where is it grown? When can it be harvested? What is its taste, smell, texture and appearance? What will it look like if we peel it or cut it in half? What are the different parts called? • Provide opportunities for children to handle, smell and taste fruit and vegetables in order to describe them through talking and drawing. e.g. What words can we use to describe the shape, colour, feel, taste? • Evaluate existing products to determine what the children like best; provide opportunities for the children to investigate preferences of their intended users/suitability for intended purposes e.g. What do you prefer and why? What might we want to include in our product to meet our user’s preferences? Which fruit/vegetables might be the best for our product to match the occasion/purpose?

IEAs

Resources

• range of fresh fruit and vegetables• chopping boards, knives, peelers, graters, skewers,juicers, spoons, jugs, plates, bowls, aprons, plastictable covers, whisks, hand washing and washing-up facilities• yogurt making machine or blender, if appropriate