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Transcript

Monkey Dust

The Law

How you might feel

Common Risks

How long the effects last

How do people take it

Additction

The chemical, cathinone, is a naturally occurring stimulant drug found in the plant, khatAlso known as Butylone, M1, Magic Crystals, Mdpv, Methylone and Pyrovalerone

Cathinones can cause feelings of euphoria and empathy as well as increasing alertness and talkativeness.

How long the effects last and the drug stays in your system depends on how much you’ve taken, your size and what other drugs you may have also taken

Cathinone is a Class B drug but there are are discussions to increase this to a class A

Most cathinones are found as either a fine white, off-white or yellowish powder, but some can be brown in colour. Mephedrone is a synthetic cathinone.

Cathinones are usually snorted like cocaine or wrapped in paper and swallowed (‘bombed’). They can also be found as capsules and pills and can be smoked

Cathinones can cause feelings of euphoria and empathy as well as increasing alertness and talkativeness. In a situation of only recently-emerging evidence on what are the exact effects and risks each of the different cathinones, it is accepted that they broadly have a balance of effects similar to amphetamines (speed) and to MDMA (ecstasy). Cathinones are ‘cousins’ of the amphetamine family of drugs, which includes amphetamine itself (speed) and MDMA (ecstasy), and which have similar effects. Cathinones are the family of related chemicals, including cathinone and many synthetically produced chemicals, like mephedrone, methylone (M1) and MDPV. The cathinones’ effects are similar to amphetamines (speed) and MDMA (ecstasy), producing feelings of euphoria and empathy as well as increasing alertness and talkativeness. The negative effects of the cathinone family are also therefore considered to be similar to those of amphetamines and MDMA.

Physical health risksTaking cathinones does involve risks. Here’s what they could do to you:

  • They risk over-stimulating the heart and circulation and damaging the heart.
  • They risk over-stimulating the nervous system and causing fits.
  • Many cathinones are still new and little is known about them, so the risks from using them are unpredictable.
Mental health risks
  • They can make you anxious and paranoid.
  • They can reduced inhibitions, which can lead to risky behaviours such as unsafe sex, and accidents.
What is cathinones cut with?As with all drugs you can never be sure of what you’re buying and how pure it is. Sometimes one cathinone is mixed with another cathinone and/or caffeine

Can you get addicted?Yes. Reports suggest that cathinones can create a state of psychological dependence and can be compulsive to use. This compulsive re-dosing may itself lead to increased health harms. The most well know cathinone is mephedrone and users have reported that once they have started a session, they can find it very difficult to stop until they’ve used their entire supply.

Cathinones were originally sold over the internet as ‘legal’ alternative to drugs like speed, ecstasy and cocaine. To avoid trouble with the police, sellers marked the cathinones they were selling as not for human consumption, and sold them as plant food or bath salts. Cathinones are usually snorted like cocaine or wrapped in paper and swallowed (‘bombed’). They can also be found as capsules and pills and can be smoked. In rare cases, cathinones have been injected. Injecting, or sharing injecting paraphernalia, runs the risk of the person injecting catching or spreading a blood-borne virus, such as HIV or hepatitis C. There is also the risk that veins may be damaged and an abscess or clot may develop.

  • This is a Class B drug, which means it’s illegal to have for yourself, give away or sell.
  • Possession can get you up to 5 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both.
  • Supplying someone else, even your friends, can get you up to 14 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both.
Like drink-driving, driving when high is dangerous and illegal. If you’re caught driving under the influence, you may receive a heavy fine, driving ban, or prison sentence. If the police catch people supplying illegal drugs in a home, club, bar or hostel, they can potentially prosecute the landlord, club owner or any other person concerned in the management of the premises.

If they are really drowsy you should:

The first things you should do are:

  • stay calm
  • calm them and be reassuring - don’t scare them or chase after them
  • try to find out what they’ve taken
  • stay with them

If they are anxious, tense or panicky you should:

Should you ever need to help someone who’s having a bad reaction, here’s what you need to know:

  • sit them in a quiet and calm room
  • keep them away from crowds, bright lights and loud noises
  • tell them to take slow deep breaths
  • stay with them

  • sit them in a quiet place and keep them awake
  • if they don’t respond or become unconscious call an ambulance immediately and place them in the recovery position
  • don’t scare them, shout at them or shock them
  • don’t give them coffee to wake them up
  • don’t put them in a cold bath to “wake them up” – this wastes time and there’s a risk of drowning

If they are unconscious or having difficulty breathing you should:

  • Immediately phone for an ambulance
  • Place them into the recovery position
  • Stay with them until the ambulance arrives
  • If you know what drug they’ve taken tell the ambulance crew immediately, it might them get the right treatment faster

If you're with someone who needs medical help, call an ambulance and tell the crew everything you know about the drugs taken, it could save their life. If you have any drugs left, hand them over to the crew as it may help.

Cathinones were originally sold over the internet as ‘legal’ alternative to drugs like speed, ecstasy and cocaine. To avoid trouble with the police, sellers marked the cathinones they were selling as not for human consumption, and sold them as plant food or bath salts. Cathinones are usually snorted like cocaine or wrapped in paper and swallowed (‘bombed’). They can also be found as capsules and pills and can be smoked. In rare cases, cathinones have been injected. Injecting, or sharing injecting paraphernalia, runs the risk of the person injecting catching or spreading a blood-borne virus, such as HIV or hepatitis C. There is also the risk that veins may be damaged and an abscess or clot may develop.