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Transcript

Creating Content worth watching

Using Multimedia Principles and Course Review Rubrics to Get the Most Out of Your Instructional Videos

Signaling Principle

People learn better when essential material is highlighted.

Presenters:Jerimy Sherin, Multimedia ManagerMargaret Bailey, Online Program Coordinator

In online classes, students typically prioritize multimedia content and a sense of belonging as the two most important factors for feeling comfortable and engaged. (Landrum, 2020).

These metrics, inspired by the Mayer Principles of Multimedia, measure the quality of multimedia content in online courses. The metrics maintain high-quality multimedia across all online courses, no matter where or how it was produced. These key principles are integrated into a broader course review rubric, providing faculty with feedback on the effectiveness of their online teaching methods.

Multimedia Principle

People learn better from words and pictures than from words alone.

Personalization Principle

People learn better when words in a multimedia lesson are presented in conversational rather than formal style.

Variability

Videos contain diverse content (example: varied visual aids, animations, varied delivery methods).

Segmenting Principle

People learn better when a multimedia lesson is presented in small user-paced segments.

Coherence Principle

People learn better when extraneous material is excluded.

Segmenting principle: People learn better when a multimedia lesson is presented in small user-paced segments.

Personalization principle: People learn better when words in a multimedia lesson are presented in conversational style rather than formal style.

Multimedia Analysis Metric

Multimedia Principle: People learn better from words and pictures than from words alone.

Variability: videos contain diverse content (example: varied visual aids, animations, on-screen annotations, and/or varied delivery methods).

Signaling principle: People learn better when essential material is highlighted. In the original video, the professor simply displayed a picture of the ballpark. In the enhanced video, the dimensions and locations of home plate and center field were highlighted to give perspective.

Coherence principle: People learn better when extraneous material is excluded.