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ROSA PARKS

CHIARA MERLI 3F

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Rosa Louise Parks was an American activist. She was a symbolic figure of the civil rights movement, who became famous for having refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in 1955, thus giving rise to the bus boycott in Montgomery.Birth: February 4, 1913, Tuskegee, Alabama, United StatesDeath: October 24, 2005, Detroit, Michigan, United StatesSpouse: Raymond Parks (d. 1932–1977)Parents: Leona McCauley, James McCauleyEducation: Highlander Folk School, Montgomery Industrial School for Girls, Alabama State Teachers College for Negroes

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Rosa Parks attended Pine Level Elementary School, where school buses took white students to their school, while black students had to walk to theirs. Rosa Parks was repeatedly bullied by white children in her neighborhood and often fought back physically.

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On December 1, 1955, Rosa was in Montgomery riding the bus home from her job as a seamstress at a department store. Finding no other free seats, he occupied first place behind the area reserved for whites, in the sector of seats accessible to both whites and blacks with the obligation for blacks to give up their seats if a white person got on while there were no seats available. reserved for available whites. After three stops, the driver James F. Blake asked her to get up and move to the back of the vehicle to give way to a white passenger who got in after her. Rosa, maintaining a calm, subdued and dignified demeanor, refused to move or leave her seat. The driver stopped the vehicle and called two police officers to resolve the matter.

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Parks was then jailed on charges of "improper conduct", but a few hours after the incident she was released from prison thanks to Clifford Durr, a white, anti-racist lawyer, who has always been involved in the battle for the civil rights of the African-American community, who decided to pay the woman's bail.

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the motto «They always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that's not true. I wasn't tired physically, any more than I usually was at the end of a day's work... No, the only thing I was tired of was suffering."

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“With her courage and example - Obama said on October 24, 2005 on the day of her death - Rosa Parks contributed to laying the foundations of a Nation that can begin to live according to her beliefs”. On that occasion the future president of the United States stated: His life and courageous actions reminded each of us of our personal responsibilities to stand up for what is right and of the central truth of the American experience that our greatness as a nation it comes from seemingly ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Rosa Parks' life was a lesson in perseverance. His solitary act of civil disobedience was also the spark that ignited the beginning of the end for segregation and inspired millions of people across the country and, ultimately, around the world to get involved in the fight for racial equality. As we honor the life of Rosa Parks, we should not limit our commemorations to lofty eulogies. Instead, let us commit to carrying on his fight, one solitary act at a time, and ensure that his passion continues to inspire as it did half a century ago. This, in my opinion, is the best way to thank her for her immense contributions to our country. Rosa Parks once said: 'As long as there's unemployment, war, crime and all the things that go to inflict the inhumanity of man on man, regardless - there's a lot to do and people have to work together.' Now that she's dead, it's up to us to make sure her message is shared. While we will miss his beloved spirit, let us work to ensure his legacy lives on in the heart of the nation. On a personal note, I think it's fair to say that if it weren't for that quiet moment of courage on Mrs. Parks' part, I wouldn't be here today. I owe her a big thank you, as does the nation.

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