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Bomb 3: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landed on central part of school, damaging the school hall. No injuries or casualties.

Bomb 6: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Hobleythick Lane. Responsible for injurying many and killing Robert Barrett Jolley (who lived at 25 Hobleythick Lane)

Bomb 48: High explosive bomb lands (one of 16 dropped that afternoon) at Manners Corner at 12:59pm, destroying flats and a ground floor shop where 15 year old Ruby Dawson was working. She died from her wounds three hours later.

Bomb 129: one of a series of 10 high explosive bombs dropped on a bombing run over Southchurch on the 19th of September 1940 and one of two bombs that hit Trinity Road. 5 were injured and 1 woman, 72 year old Martha Olding, was killed.

Bomb 125: One of a series of 10 high explosive bombs dropped on a bombing run over Southchurch on the 19th of September. 5 were injured and 1 woman, 72 year old Martha Olding, was killed.

Bomb 134: Prittlewell Priory bombed on 25th of September 1940.

Bomb 5: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Hobleythick Lane. Major damage to a few houses, minor damage to almost 100 houses and responsible for injuring up to 12 people.

Bomb 2: High Explosive bomb (50kg) which damaged the end of Southend High School for Boys' north wing. No injuries or casualties.

Bomb 4: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Hobleythick Lane. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 11: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Ulster Avenue.

Bomb 12: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Ulster Avenue.

Bomb 13: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Ulster Avenue.

Bomb 14: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in West Road. A married couple, Mr and Mrs. Heard of 45 West Road, were killed when the bomb landed in their garden.

Bomb 15: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in West Road.

Bomb 45: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm.

Bomb 46: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm.

Bomb 47: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm.

Bomb 49: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm.

Bomb 50: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm.

Bomb 51: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 52: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 53: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 54: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 55: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 56: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 57: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 58: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 59: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Manners Way, 28 August 1940, 12.59pm. Unexploded.

Bomb 87: August 31st, 1940 - less than 100 incendiary bombs were dropped over 68, Thornford Gardens. No casualties reported.

Bomb 62: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Bomb 63: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Bomb 64: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Bomb 65: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Bomb 66: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Bomb 67: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Bomb 68: Enemy bomber shot down over Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940. Three of the crew of five were killed, two were detained. Seven unexploded H.E. bombs (6 250kg bombs and 1 50kg) were scattered around the crash site including this one.

Heinkel HE 111 crash landed at Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940 - of the crew of five, three were killed and two were captured.

Bomb 7: one of a series of four high explosive bombs dropped on a bombing run over Southend Foreshore. The bombs were dropped just after midnight (00:10am) on 10 August 1940; many properties were damaged and one woman lightly injured.

Bomb 8: one of a series of four high explosive bombs dropped on a bombing run over Southend Foreshore. The bombs were dropped just after midnight (00:10am) on 10 August 1940; many properties were damaged and one woman lightly injured.

Bomb 9: one of a series of four high explosive bombs dropped on a bombing run over Southend Foreshore. The bombs were dropped just after midnight (00:10am) on 10 August 1940; many properties were damaged and one woman lightly injured.

Bomb 10: one of a series of four high explosive bombs dropped on a bombing run over Southend Foreshore. The bombs were dropped just after midnight (00:10am) on 10 August 1940; many properties were damaged and one woman lightly injured.

Bomb 16: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landed in the vicinity of what was then known as 'Postman's Walk', where Leitrim Avenue meets Lodwick. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 17: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing on Shoeburyness Train Station. Signalman Charles Walter Speller was killed when the bomb scored a direct hit on his Signal Box.

Bomb 18: one of two high explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing on Shoeburyness Train Station. Signalman Charles Walter Speller was killed when a bomb scored a direct hit on his Signal Box.

Bomb 19: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Wakering Avenue.

Bomb 20: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Wakering Avenue.

Bomb 21: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Shoebury High Street. Along with another high explosive bomb (Bomb 22), this bomb caused 5 injuries, 2 men and 3 women.

August 18th, 1940 - as part of the Battle of Britain, in what has now been christened 'The Hardest Day', the German Luftwaffe enacted their plan to target RAF airfields in the South East of England. Shoeburyness was bombed as a result.

Bomb 60: Bomb dropped on Victoria Avenue at 12:59pm on the 28th August 1940. Ms Rossi was severely injured and died the next day at Southend General Hospital.

Bomb 23: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 24: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 25: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm. No casualties reported. This bomb was dropped just outside 26 Friar's Street, the house of Mr and Mrs. Speller.

Bomb 26: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in open ground between Shoeburyness High Street and Wakering Avenue. No casualties reported.

Bomb 27: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing on an allotment east of Shoeburyness High Street. No casualties reported.

Bomb 28: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing on a brickfield east of Shoeburyness High Street. No casualties reported.

Bomb 29: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing on a brickfield east of Shoeburyness High Street. No casualties reported.

Bomb 30: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing on Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 31: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in fields opposite Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 32: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 33: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 34: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 35: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 36: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 37: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 38: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 39: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 40: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in field north of Blackgate Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 41: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing to the rear side of Church Street. No casualties were reported.

Bomb 42: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing to the rear side of Shoebury Avenue. No casualties were reported.

Heinkel HE 111 crash landed at Lifstan Way on 30th August 1940 - of the crew of five, three were killed and two were captured.

Bomb 69: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing 250 yards west of the pier on Southend foreshore. No damage or casualties reported.

Bomb 70: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing west of the pier on Southend foreshore. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 71: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing west of the pier on Southend foreshore. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 72: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing close to the Western Esplanade. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 73: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing at Royal Terrace. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 90: One of five High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 31st August 1940 at Wick Farm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 91: One of five High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 31st August 1940 at Wick Farm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 92: One of five High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 31st August 1940 at Wick Farm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 88: One of five High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 31st August 1940 at Wick Farm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 89: One of five High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 31st August 1940 at Wick Farm. No casualties reported.

Bomb 93: High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 1st September 1940 just off of Eastern Avenue. No casualties reported.

Bomb 94: High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 1st September 1940 just off of Eastern Avenue. No casualties reported.

Bomb 95: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing at Rochford Aerodrome on 2nd September 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 44: Cluster of High Explosive bombs dropped into Shoeburyness Foreshore, approximately weighing 300 tons. All unexploded.

Bomb 96: High explosive bomb (50kg) landing at New Ranges, Shoeburyness. Unexploded.

Bomb 97: High explosive bomb (50kg) landing at New Ranges, Shoeburyness. Unexploded.

Bomb 22: High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Shoebury High Street. Along with another high explosive bomb (Bomb 22), this bomb caused 5 injuries, 2 men and 3 women.

Bomb 43: Two 1kg incendiary bombs dropped on Ulster Avenue at 17:36pm.

Bomb 74: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 75: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 76: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 78: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 77: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 79: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 81: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 80: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 82: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 84: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 83: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 85: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 86: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwoodbury Lane, 31 August 1940. Unexploded.

Bomb 99: High Explosive bombs (50kg) dropped on 6th September, 1940 on Stuart Road. One boy was injured.

Bomb 100: Anti aircraft shell landing in St. David's Drive, Leigh on 14th September 1940 targeting enemy planes. Unexploded.

Bomb 101: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwood Rise, 15th September 1940. No casualties reported.

Bomb 102: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing in Eastwood Rise, 15th September 1940. No casualties reported.

Bomb 103: Oil bomb lands in Eastwood Rise, 15th September 1940. No casualties reported.

Bomb 105: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Chalkwell foreshore on 15th September 1940. No damage or casualties reported.

Bomb 104: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Chalkwell foreshore on 15th September 1940. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 106: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Chalkwell foreshore on 15th September 1940. No damage or casualties reported.

Bomb 107: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Chalkwell foreshore on 15th September 1940. No damage or casualties reported.

Bomb 116: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940. One woman was injured.

Bomb 117: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940. One woman was injured.

Bomb 115: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940. One woman was injured.

Bomb 121: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940.

Bomb 120: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940.

Bomb 119: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940.

Bomb 122: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on south of Bell Wharf, Leigh foreshore on 18th September 1940. Failed to detonate.

Bomb 123: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing at Southchurch Hall. No damage or casualties reported.

Bomb 124: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Ilfracombe Avenue. No casualties reported.

Bomb 126: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing between Glenmore Street and Surbiton Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 98: September 6th, 1940 - less than 100 incendiary bombs were dropped over Elm Farm in Shoeburyness. No casualties reported.

Bomb 127: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Surbiton Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 128: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Stornoway Road. Three men and two women injured.

Bomb 130: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Trinity Road. No casualties reported.

Bomb 131: High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Hamstel Road, opposite Hamstel Road Primary School. No casualties reported.

Bomb 132: one of two High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on open ground adjoining Hamstel Road Primary School. No casualties reported.

Bomb 133: one of two High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on open ground adjoining Hamstel Road Primary School. No casualties reported.

Bomb 134: Prittlewell Priory bombed on 25th of September 1940.

Bomb 134: Prittlewell Priory bombed on 25th of September 1940.

Bomb 134: Prittlewell Priory bombed on 25th of September 1940.

Bomb 134: Prittlewell Priory bombed on 25th of September 1940.

Bomb 135: September 25th, 1940. Oil Bomb dropped in Priory Park. No casualties reported.

Bomb 140: A.A. Shell landing on North Shoebury Road on 28th September, 1940. Unexploded. No casualties reported.

Bomb 141: 29th of September, 1940. 6:50am. High Explosive bomb (50kg) landing on Carnarvon Road, 10 yards from a communal bomb shelter. One man was injured.

Bomb 142: Bomb dropped on the corner of Carnvarvon and Tonbridge Road at 6.50am. Two men, part of the A.R.P, were casualties. One was killed, and the other suffered some minor wounds and a bad case of shock.

Multiple bombs were dropped in Priory Park on the 25th of September, 1940 - this included five high explosive bombs (one failed to detonate) and an oil bomb.Oil bombs were generally much larger (250kg or more) than the more commonly used high explosive bombs (these were largely 50kg in weight) but were far less reliable in their damage output.Oil bombs were incendiary ordnance and were used on targets susceptible to fire damage - the open grass of priory park had been repurposed as farming for food production during the war and as such was a desirable target for an oil bomb.

Bomb 134: Priory Park Bombed

Bomb 125: Bomb narrowly misses the Plaza Cinema

On the 19th of September, 1940 at 9:50am during a bombing run over Southchurch, a 50kg high explosive bomb narrowly missed the Plaza Cinema in Southchurch.The bomb landed in the road between what is now the Exchange pub and the Christian Fellowship Youth Church, at the junction of Lovelace Gardens and Southchurch Road. The Exchange was formerly a shop, and the proximity of the bomb's landing site caused the windows to shatter. No casualties were reported.

Damage caused by a bomb that fell on what isnow The Exchange.

In the early hours of the 10th August 1940, at 00:10am in the morning, four high explosive bombs (50kg) were dropped on the foreshore opposite Eastern Esplanade.Many of the door frames and windows on Eastern Esplanade were blown out, but other than one lady who suffered a cut to her forehead and a few shaken up pet Canaries, no issues were reported.Many of the houses on Eastern Esplanade had been intentionally vacated previously and thus threat to human life was always slim. The roofs of many houses were rebuilt after this bombing run as many did not survive.

Bombs 7 - 10: Early Morning Bombing at the Foreshore

Shops damaged by bombs on Eastern Esplanade

Bomb 103: Oil Bomb lands at Eastwood Rise

Alongside two 50kg high explosive bombs, an oil bomb was dropped on Eastwood Rise, Leigh. These oil bombs contained an oil incendiary mixture that was intended to break out of the bomb shell on impact and ignite via TNT charge (see image). These bombs were found to spread oil effectively upon the bomb breaking on the ground, but struggled to ignite said oil mixture. This lead to these bombs being used far less frequently from 1940 onwards.

Internal view of a 500kg German oil bomb, credit for image: Bombs Away UXO

News report of the oil bomb on Eastwood Rise

An example of a 500kg German oil bomb, credit for image: Bombs Away UXO

As part of the Battle of Britain, in what has now been christened 'The Hardest Day', the German Luftwaffe enacted their plan to target RAF airfields in the South East of England. August 18th saw the most number of aircraft on both sides lost in a single day.In targeting North Weald and Hornchurch airfields, two of the planes responsible for bombing Shoeburyness were shot down above the Thames Estuary - a Heinkel HE III and a Messerschmitt. The Heinkel force landed at Small Gains Farm on Foulness Island - the entire crew bar one, Fw. J. Wild - who had bailed out early and died the next day from his injuries, were captured and taken to London via Shoeburyness Station. The Messerschmitt crashed on the nearby Isle of Sheppey at Leysdown - Uffz. T. Rutters was badly burned but captured whilst the pilot, 19 year old Uffz. H. Jaeckel, was killed.

Britain's 'Hardest Day' - 18th August 1940

One of the captured German airmen waiting for internment to London at Shoebury Station

Another captured German airman escorted to London on the 18th August, 1940.

Bomb 3: Bombs dropped on Southend High School for Boys

Five H.E. (high explosive) bombs were dropped on Tuesday the 18th of June 1940 shortly before midnight at 11:22pm. Three fell over Hobleythick Lane and two hit the school. This injured 13 (6 men, 6 women, one boy) and killed a man - a chaffeur - Mr.Jolley.The school had only recently had additions made to it two years prior, in 1937. Luckily, no-one was inside the school at the time of the air raid. This bomb hit the central part of the school, damaging the school hall.

The school hall.

Two bombs gets a direct hit on SHSB.

One of the bombsfell on the school'snorthern wing.

Great Britain and her territories had been at war with Germany since then Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's public declaration of war on September the 3rd, 1939. Much of Southend had been quickly adjusted to its new reality, with the coastal defences readied in quick time and the nearby Pier transforming into an important wartime base in the form of HMS Leigh Just 4 months on from Chamberlain's formal declaration of war, much had changed for the citizens of Southend - families bid best wishes as fathers, brothers and sons were mobilised, letters and gifts regularly sent from front to home and cutbacks and concessions at home were gladly suffered to muck in for the common cause. Christmas of 1940 was full of hope and optimism that belied a country at war, and citizens of Southend revelled in a characteristic January cold snap that brought ice and snow to the shores of the Thames Estuary. Families went ice skating at nearby parks and kids enjoyed a slide down Pier Hill - spirits were high. 4 months more would bring Southend's first air raid and an abrupt new reality - the war had reached home.

Merrymaking in the face of War - January 1940

Families skate on two-inch thick ice at Southchurch Park, 3rd Jan 1940

Two children slide down Pier Hill on 1st Jan 1940

Bomb 17: Shoeburyness Train Station

Signal Box that Mr.Speller was postedat on the 18th August 1940. The bomb was said to have ricocheted off the bridge, landing directly inside the Signal Box.

Charles Walter Speller, born in Shoebury in 1885.

In the raids over the Thames Estuary between 17:40-18.00, there were 54 bomber raids on Shoeburyness, with 4 houses destroyed, as well as a water-mains , signal box and seven rail tracks also destroyed after approximately 180 bombs of various types were dropped. 3 civilians were killed: Mr. and Mrs Heard on West Road and Charles Walter Speller, who worked as a signalman at Shoeburyness Station.According to the Southend Standard, the bomb ricocheted off of the bridge above and landed directly inside Mr.Speller's signal box (pictured above). His house on Friar's Street was also bombed, however his wife survived the ordeal unharmed. Mr.Speller was 55 years old at the time of his death, having worked on the railways for 36 years..

Southend Standard article on the bombing of Shoebury Station

Bomb 2: Bombs dropped on Southend High School for Boys

Five H.E. (high explosive) bombs were dropped on Tuesday the 18th of June 1940 shortly before midnight at 11:22pm. Three fell over Hobleythick Lane and two hit the school. This injured 13 (6 men, 6 women, one boy) and killed a man - a chaffeur - Mr.Jolley.The school had only recently had additions made to it two years prior, in 1937. Luckily, no-one was inside the school at the time of the air raid. This bomb hit the northern wing of the school.

The school hall.

Two bombs gets a direct hit on SHSB.

One of the bombsfell on the school'snorthern wing.

Heinkel HE 111 Bomber Crash on Lifstan Way

On the 30th August 1940, a Heinkel HE 111 manned by a crew of five was shot down and crashed on Lifstan Way - Junior Officer Adolf Saam (flight engineer), Sergeant Ernst Erhard Von Kuenheim (radio officer) and Senior Lance Corporal Otto Fischer (rear gunner) were all killed in action. Leuitenant Wolf Roesler (observer) escaped the plane via parachute and landed in Thorpe Hall Golf Course and Junior Officer Helmut Gall (pilot) landed on Southend foreshore, just east of the Pier.One woman was killed by falling debris and the crash site was littered with 7 unexploded bombs, 1 50kg H.E. bomb and 6 significantly more dangerous 250kg bombs. A chilling thought if they had been used.

Site of the crash - the plane crashed at the current site of the children's play area

Heinkel HE 111 on Lifstan Way

Image of wreckage

In the early hours of the 10th August 1940, at 00:10am in the morning, four high explosive bombs (50kg) were dropped on the foreshore opposite Eastern Esplanade.Many of the door frames and windows on Eastern Esplanade were blown out, but other than one lady who suffered a cut to her forehead and a few shaken up pet Canaries, no issues were reported.Many of the houses on Eastern Esplanade had been intentionally vacated previously and thus threat to human life was always slim. The roofs of many houses were rebuilt after this bombing run as many did not survive.

Bombs 7 - 10: Early Morning Bombing at the Foreshore

Shops damaged by bombs on Eastern Esplanade

Bomb dropped on Victoria Avenue at 12:59pm on the 28th August 1940. Part of the same flight that bombed Manners Way - it is likely this bomb was targeting Southend Victoria Station. This injured one woman, Ms. Doris Theresa Rossi, aged 38. She lived at 28 Harcourt Avenue.The daughter of Julius Napoleon Rossi and Catherine Rossi, Doris unfortunately succumbed to her injuries and later died at Southend General Hospital a day later on the 29th of August.

Bomb 60: Victoria Avenue

Ms. Rossi was killed when a 50kg high explosive bomb landed on Victoria Avenue, roughly opposite the current Beecroft Art Gallery

Bomb 18: Shoeburyness Train Station

Signal Box that Mr.Speller was postedat on the 18th August 1940. The bomb was said to have ricocheted off the bridge, landing directly inside the Signal Box.

Charles Walter Speller, born in Shoebury in 1885.

In the raids over the Thames Estuary between 17:40-18.00, there were 54 bomber raids on Shoeburyness, with 4 houses destroyed, as well as a water-mains , signal box and seven rail tracks also destroyed after approximately 180 bombs of various types were dropped. 3 civilians were killed: Mr. and Mrs Heard on West Road and Charles Walter Speller, who worked as a signalman at Shoeburyness Station.Mr. Speller had worked at Shoeburyness Train Station for 20 years and lived nearby at 26 Friars Street, having previously been born in Shoeburyness in 1885, living on Shoebury High Street. He lived with his wife, Amy Ellen Speller (nee Scraggs), who attended his funeral at 3.15pm at Sutton Road Cemetary on Thursday, 23rd August 1940.

Southend Standard article on the bombing of Shoebury Station

Bombs 14 and 15: West Road

A countrywide series of bombing raids took place on the 18th August 1940 - dubbed 'The Hardest Day' during the Battle of Britain.

Damage caused by the H.E bomb that fell at 45 West Rd

Obituary of Mr and Mrs.Heard from Southend Standard, 22/08/1940

In the raids over the Thames Estuary between 17:40-18.00, there were 54 bomber raids on Shoeburyness, with 4 houses destroyed, as well as a water-mains , signal box and seven rail tracks also destroyed after approximately 180 bombs of various types were dropped. 3 civilians were killed, including Mr. and Mrs Heard.

A report on the bombing of West Road in the Southend Standard

In the early hours of the 10th August 1940, at 00:10am in the morning, four high explosive bombs (50kg) were dropped on the foreshore opposite Eastern Esplanade.Many of the door frames and windows on Eastern Esplanade were blown out, but other than one lady who suffered a cut to her forehead and a few shaken up pet Canaries, no issues were reported.Many of the houses on Eastern Esplanade had been intentionally vacated previously and thus threat to human life was always slim. The roofs of many houses were rebuilt after this bombing run as many did not survive.

Bombs 7 - 10: Early Morning Bombing at the Foreshore

4 bombs fell on the foreshore opposite. Damage was largely minor and caused by broken glass

Houses and shops on the foreshore weredamaged

On the 3rd of September, as many as 5 enemy planes were brought down during a bombing run on Hornchurch airfield. Bf 110C-2 (3225) 3U+KR of 7/ZG26 was shot down by Flying Officer B. Van Mentz of 222 Squadron and Flying Officer D.A.P. McMullen, Pilot Officers C.F. Gray and S. Baker of 54 Squadron during combat over the Thames Estuary at 10.38am. The plane came down 200 yards north of Poynters Lane, 300 yards west of Star Lane and was in surprisingly good condition despite it's violent landing. From the crew, Fw H. Grau was captured and Uffz G. Uecker was also captured but died of his wounds the next day in Southend General Hospital.F/O Van Mentz was credited with helping destroy two Messerschmitts that day - he went on to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross for his efforts. On 26th April, 1941, Van Mentz and others from the 222 Squadron, with the Battle of Britain seemingly over, wound down from duties with some drinks in the Ferry Inn (a pub near Horning) when a bomb hit the pub directly - Van Mentz was one of 21 people killed in the blast. He was 23 and his final total of aerial victories stood at 8.

3rd September, 1940: Messerschmitt brought down by North Shoebury House

Flying Officer Brian Van Mentz

Report from Southend Standard.

Damaged Messerschmitt by North Shoebury House

The squad emblem of the Luftwaffe's 7th Squadron, part of the 26ZG (Zerstörergeschwader) - a penguin carrying a parasol - was marked on the plane.

At 11.22pm on the 18th of June, 1940 Southend residents experienced their first meaningful run in with Nazi Germany's Luftwaffe - five high explosive bombs were dropped, with three landing in Hobleythick Lane and two hitting Southend High School for Boys.A testament to the destructive force of the 50kg high explosive bombs dropped by the Luftwaffe, the resultant damage of the two bombs (one had failed to detonate) that had exploded in Hobleythick Lane completely destroyed two houses and damaged almost a hundred. There were 12 reported injuries, and one casualty - Mr. Robert Barrett Jolley, a chaffeur who lived at 25 Hobleythick Lane. Mr. Jolley was shouting to his son to wake up and head down to the bomb shelter from the landing of his house when he was struck with a large splinter of the detonated bomb. When interviewed, a family member stated that as recently as the previous Sunday (16th June), Mr.Jolley had said "I have a feeling I shall be the first of us to go" and that "If its got your number on it, you'll get it!"

Bomb 6: Bombs on Hobleythick Lane

Bomb 21 + 22: Bombs on Shoebury High Street

Five were injured when two bombs fell directly on two Anderson shelters. The force was enough to tear the shelters out of the ground and whilst one shelter was empty, the other contained five persons, a mixture of families.

On the 28th of August 1940, 21 bombers flew over Southend, dropping approximately 80 bombs. Manners Way was hit by a total of 15 50kg high explosive bombs (many however did not detonate). Mrs.Barrett and her Neighbour Mrs.Cooper sheltered in her home-made concrete shelter - the door was blown in but only minor injuries were sustained. Of her bungalow, Mrs.Barrett stated "It is such a pity about our home...we were so happy in it".A shop situated at the bottom of a block of flats was completely decimated, with the young shop clerk - 15 year old Ruby Dawson - dying from her wounds later in hospital. Two other women, Mrs. Mitchell who was on Manners Way, and Ms. Rossi, who was on Victoria Avenue, also died later from their injuries at Southend General Hospital.

Bomb 48: Manners Way

Shop and flat complex on Manners Way

Destroyed bungalow belonging to Mrs.Barrett

Mrs. Barrett (right) and her neighbour Mrs.Cooper

On the 19th of September, 1940 at 9:50am, Trinity Road was hit by two 50kg high explosive bombs. One destroyed the house of postman Charles Powell, 153 Trinity Road, burying him and his mother-in-law, 72 year old Martha Olding, under the wreckage of the house.Mr.Powell was rescued from the wreckage and sent to a nearby first aid post for treatment, and Mrs.Powell - his wife - was uninjured but required treatment for shock. Mrs. Olding however was found to be dead under the rubble. A shop and other houses were also damaged.

Bomb 129: Trinity Road

Damage from a high explosive bomb on Trinity Road

Bomb damage on Trinity Rd

Bomb 11 - Ulster Avenue

High Explosive bomb (50kg) dropped on 18th August 1940 at 5:36pm landing in Ulster Avenue. One of three bombs dropped on Ulster Avenue during the bombing raids on the 18th of August 1940. No casualties or injuries were reported. In the picture, two children stand in the bomb crater for scale of the depth of the crater!

Bomb 21 + 22: Bombs on Shoebury High Street

Five were injured when two bombs fell directly on two Anderson shelters. The force was enough to tear the shelters out of the ground and whilst one shelter was empty, the other contained five persons, a mixture of families.

In the early hours of the 10th August 1940, at 00:10am in the morning, four high explosive bombs (50kg) were dropped on the foreshore opposite Eastern Esplanade.Many of the door frames and windows on Eastern Esplanade were blown out, but other than one lady who suffered a cut to her forehead and a few shaken up pet Canaries, no issues were reported.Many of the houses on Eastern Esplanade had been intentionally vacated previously and thus threat to human life was always slim. The roofs of many houses were rebuilt after this bombing run as many did not survive.

Bombs 7 - 10: Early Morning Bombing at the Foreshore

4 bombs fell on the foreshore opposite. Damage was largely minor and caused by broken glass

Houses and shops on the foreshore weredamaged

Heinkel HE 111 Bomber Crash on Lifstan Way

On the 30th August 1940, a Heinkel HE 111 manned by a crew of five was shot down and crashed on Lifstan Way - Junior Officer Adolf Saam (flight engineer), Sergeant Ernst Erhard Von Kuenheim (radio officer) and Senior Lance Corporal Otto Fischer (rear gunner) were all killed in action. Leuitenant Wolf Roesler (observer) escaped the plane via parachute and landed in Thorpe Hall Golf Course and Junior Officer Helmut Gall (pilot) landed on Southend foreshore, just east of the Pier.One woman was killed by falling debris and the crash site was littered with 7 unexploded bombs, 1 50kg H.E. bomb and 6 significantly more dangerous 250kg bombs. A chilling thought if they had been used.

Crew member bailing out of crashing plane

Captured airman in Southend

Image of wreckage

Multiple bombs were dropped in Priory Park on the 25th of September, 1940 - this included five high explosive bombs (one failed to detonate) and an oil bomb.Oil bombs were generally much larger (250kg or more) than the more commonly used high explosive bombs (these were largely 50kg in weight) but were far less reliable in their damage output.Oil bombs were incendiary ordnance and were used on targets susceptible to fire damage - the open grass of priory park had been repurposed as farming for food production during the war and as such was a desirable target for an oil bomb.

Bomb 139: Priory Park Bombed

Multiple bombs were dropped in Priory Park on the 25th of September, 1940 - this included five high explosive bombs (one failed to detonate) and an oil bomb.Oil bombs were generally much larger (250kg or more) than the more commonly used high explosive bombs (these were largely 50kg in weight) but were far less reliable in their damage output.Oil bombs were incendiary ordnance and were used on targets susceptible to fire damage - the open grass of priory park had been repurposed as farming for food production during the war and as such was a desirable target for an oil bomb.

Bomb 138: Priory Park Bombed

Multiple bombs were dropped in Priory Park on the 25th of September, 1940 - this included five high explosive bombs (one failed to detonate) and an oil bomb.Oil bombs were generally much larger (250kg or more) than the more commonly used high explosive bombs (these were largely 50kg in weight) but were far less reliable in their damage output.Oil bombs were incendiary ordnance and were used on targets susceptible to fire damage - the open grass of priory park had been repurposed as farming for food production during the war and as such was a desirable target for an oil bomb.

Bomb 137: Priory Park Bombed

Multiple bombs were dropped in Priory Park on the 25th of September, 1940 - this included five high explosive bombs (one failed to detonate) and an oil bomb.Oil bombs were generally much larger (250kg or more) than the more commonly used high explosive bombs (these were largely 50kg in weight) but were far less reliable in their damage output.Oil bombs were incendiary ordnance and were used on targets susceptible to fire damage - the open grass of priory park had been repurposed as farming for food production during the war and as such was a desirable target for an oil bomb.

Bomb 136: Priory Park Bombed

At 6:50am in the morning, on Sunday the 29th of September, a lone German plane dropped a line of various bombs beginning at Carnarvon Road, and ending at Great Eastern Avenue. James Henry Colman, aged 47, was part of the A.R.P (Air Raid Precautions) team for his area - the A.R.P. would ensure residents adhered to blackout rules and would clear debris and hand out gasmasks to neighbourhoods. Alongside his neighbour and best friend, Percy Gridley, he had just opened the back of their Water Services van when a bomb landed a few feet from him. He was killed instantly.

Bomb 142: Carnarvon Road

Excerpt detailing the bombing of Carnarvon Road and the death of Mr.Colman from The Southend Standard.

Article on the bomb that killed Mr.Colman from The Southend Standard.